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Exploring Applications of Eye Tracking in Operational Meteorology Research

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  • 1 Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 2 NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 3 School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
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Abstract

Eye-tracking technology can observe where and how someone’s eye gaze is directed, and therefore provides information about one’s attention and related cognitive processes in real time. The use of eye-tracking methods is evident in a variety of research domains, and has been used on few occasions within the meteorology community. With the goals of Weather Ready Nation in mind, eye-tracking applications in meteorology have so far supported the need to address how people interpret meteorological information through televised forecasts and graphics. However, eye tracking has not yet been applied to learning about forecaster behavior and decision processes. In this article, we consider what current methods are being used to study forecasters and why we believe eye tracking is a method that should be incorporated into our efforts. We share our first data collection of an NWS forecaster’s eye gaze data, and explore the types of information that these data provide about the forecaster’s cognitive processes. We also discuss how eye-tracking methods could be applied to other aspects of operational meteorology research in the future, and provide motivation for further exploration on this topic.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Katie Wilson, 120 David L. Boren Blvd, Norman, OK 73072, E-mail: katie.bowden@noaa.gov

Abstract

Eye-tracking technology can observe where and how someone’s eye gaze is directed, and therefore provides information about one’s attention and related cognitive processes in real time. The use of eye-tracking methods is evident in a variety of research domains, and has been used on few occasions within the meteorology community. With the goals of Weather Ready Nation in mind, eye-tracking applications in meteorology have so far supported the need to address how people interpret meteorological information through televised forecasts and graphics. However, eye tracking has not yet been applied to learning about forecaster behavior and decision processes. In this article, we consider what current methods are being used to study forecasters and why we believe eye tracking is a method that should be incorporated into our efforts. We share our first data collection of an NWS forecaster’s eye gaze data, and explore the types of information that these data provide about the forecaster’s cognitive processes. We also discuss how eye-tracking methods could be applied to other aspects of operational meteorology research in the future, and provide motivation for further exploration on this topic.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Katie Wilson, 120 David L. Boren Blvd, Norman, OK 73072, E-mail: katie.bowden@noaa.gov
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