A 20-Year History of NSF-Supported Atmospheric Science Field Campaigns: Statistics and Demographics

Linnea M. Avallone Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virginia

Search for other papers by Linnea M. Avallone in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
Brigitte Baeuerle Earth Observing Laboratory, NationalCenter for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado

Search for other papers by Brigitte Baeuerle in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Abstract

Over the past two decades, the National Science Foundation’s Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) has funded nearly 200 atmospheric science–related field campaigns that have included deployment of AGS-sponsored observing facilities. These projects have spanned the range from modest, single-investigator experiments to massive, multi-investigator, multiagency campaigns. They have occurred both domestically and abroad, on every continent and over most oceans. In this article, we present an analysis of some of the details about these campaigns, including such elements as deployment location and cost of the campaign, and of statistics related to the principal investigators (e.g., type and location of institution, gender, years since degree). In addition, we assess trends in field campaign cost. These results provide a retrospective view of atmospheric science field work that has been supported since 1992.

© 2017 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Linnea Avallone, lavallon@nsf.gov

Abstract

Over the past two decades, the National Science Foundation’s Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) has funded nearly 200 atmospheric science–related field campaigns that have included deployment of AGS-sponsored observing facilities. These projects have spanned the range from modest, single-investigator experiments to massive, multi-investigator, multiagency campaigns. They have occurred both domestically and abroad, on every continent and over most oceans. In this article, we present an analysis of some of the details about these campaigns, including such elements as deployment location and cost of the campaign, and of statistics related to the principal investigators (e.g., type and location of institution, gender, years since degree). In addition, we assess trends in field campaign cost. These results provide a retrospective view of atmospheric science field work that has been supported since 1992.

© 2017 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Linnea Avallone, lavallon@nsf.gov
Save
  • Hartten, L. M. and M. A. LeMone, 2010: The evolution and current state of the atmospheric sciences “pipeline.” Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 91, 942956, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2537.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 398 63 1
PDF Downloads 196 42 6