• Bosveld, F. C., and Coauthors, 2020: Fifty years of atmospheric boundary-layer research at Cabauw serving weather, air quality and climate. Bound.-Layer Meteor., 177, 583612, https://doi.org/10.1007/S10546-020-00541-W.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Bruijn, E. I. F., F. C. Bosveld, S. de Haan, B. Wichers Schreur, and A. A. M. Holtslag, 2016: Observing boundary layer wind from hot-air balloon flights. Wea. Forecasting, 31, 14511463, https://doi.org/10.1175/WAF-D-16-0028.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Bruijn, E. I. F., F. C. Bosveld, S. de Haan, and B. G. Heusinkveld, 2020: Measuring low altitude wind with a hot-air balloon and their validation with Cabauw tower observations. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 43, 263277, https://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-19-0043.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • de Vos, L. W., A. M. Droste, M. J. Zander, A. Overeem, H. Leijnse, B. G. Heusinkveld, G. J. Steeneveld, and R. Uijlenhoet, 2020: Hydrometeorological monitoring using opportunistic sensing networks in the Amsterdam metropolitan area. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 101, E167E185, https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-19-0091.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Goger, B., M. W. Rotach, A. Gohm, O. Fuhrer, I. Stiperski, and A. A. M. Holtslag, 2018: The impact of three-dimensional effects on the simulation of turbulence kinetic energy in a major alpine valley. Bound.-Layer Meteor., 168, 127, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10546-018-0341-y.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lothon, M., and Coauthors, 2014: The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-layer late afternoon and sunset turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10 93110 960, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-14-10931-2014.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Petterson, S., 1956: Motion and Motion Systems. Vol. 1, Weather Analysis and Forecasting, McGraw-Hill, 428 pp.

  • Undén, P., and Coauthors, 2002: HIRLAM-5 scientific documentation. HIRLAM-5 Project, 144 pp., https://repositorio.aemet.es/bitstream/20.500.11765/6323/1/HIRLAMSciDoc_Dec2002.pdf.

  • Zardi, D., and C. D. Whiteman, 2013: Diurnal mountain wind systems. Mountain Weather Research and Forecasting. F. K. Chow, S. F. J. De Wekker, and B. Snyder, Eds., Springer, 35–119, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-4098-3_2.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 5 5 5
Full Text Views 135 135 135
PDF Downloads 140 140 140

Opportunistic Sensing with Recreational Hot-Air Balloon Flights

View More View Less
  • 1 KNMI, De Bilt, Netherlands
  • 2 Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

We report about a new third-party observation, namely, wind measurements derived from hot-air balloon (HAB) tracks. We first compare the HAB winds with wind measurements from a meteorological tower and a radio acoustic wind profiler, both situated at the topographically flat observatory near Cabauw, the Netherlands. To explore the potential of this new type of wind observation in other topographies, we present an intriguing HAB flight in Austria with a spectacular mountain–valley circulation. Subsequently, we compare the HAB data with a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model during 2011–13 and the standard deviation of the wind speed is 2.3 m s−1. Finally, we show results from a data assimilation feasibility experiment that reveals that HAB wind information can have a positive impact on a hindcasted NWP trajectory.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Evert I. F. de Bruijn, cisco.de.bruijn@knmi.nl

Abstract

We report about a new third-party observation, namely, wind measurements derived from hot-air balloon (HAB) tracks. We first compare the HAB winds with wind measurements from a meteorological tower and a radio acoustic wind profiler, both situated at the topographically flat observatory near Cabauw, the Netherlands. To explore the potential of this new type of wind observation in other topographies, we present an intriguing HAB flight in Austria with a spectacular mountain–valley circulation. Subsequently, we compare the HAB data with a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model during 2011–13 and the standard deviation of the wind speed is 2.3 m s−1. Finally, we show results from a data assimilation feasibility experiment that reveals that HAB wind information can have a positive impact on a hindcasted NWP trajectory.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Evert I. F. de Bruijn, cisco.de.bruijn@knmi.nl
Save