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The NCAR Climate System Model Global Ocean Component

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  • 1 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
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Abstract

This paper describes the global ocean component of the NCAR Climate System Model. New parameterizations of the effects of mesoscale eddies and of the upper-ocean boundary layer are included. Numerical improvements include a third-order upwind advection scheme and elimination of the artificial North Pole island in the original MOM 1.1 code. Updated forcing fields are used to drive the ocean-alone solution, which is integrated long enough so that it is in equilibrium. The ocean transports and potential temperature and salinity distributions are compared with observations. The solution sensitivity to the freshwater forcing distribution is highlighted, and the sensitivity to resolution is also briefly discussed.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Peter R. Gent, NCAR/CGD, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000.

Email: gent@ucar.edu

Abstract

This paper describes the global ocean component of the NCAR Climate System Model. New parameterizations of the effects of mesoscale eddies and of the upper-ocean boundary layer are included. Numerical improvements include a third-order upwind advection scheme and elimination of the artificial North Pole island in the original MOM 1.1 code. Updated forcing fields are used to drive the ocean-alone solution, which is integrated long enough so that it is in equilibrium. The ocean transports and potential temperature and salinity distributions are compared with observations. The solution sensitivity to the freshwater forcing distribution is highlighted, and the sensitivity to resolution is also briefly discussed.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Peter R. Gent, NCAR/CGD, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000.

Email: gent@ucar.edu

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