Objective Quantification of Drought Severity and Duration

Hi-Ryong Byun Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Pukyong National University, Namku, Pusan, South Korea

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Donald A. Wilhite National Drought Mitigation Center, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska

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Abstract

Common weaknesses of current drought indexes were analyzed. First, most of the current indexes are not precise enough in detecting the onset, end, and accumulated stress of drought. Second, they do not effectively take into account the aggravating effects of runoff and evapotranspiration, which build up with time. Third, they have a limited usefulness in monitoring ongoing drought because they are based on a monthly time step. Fourth, most of them fail to differentiate the effects of drought on surface and subsurface water supply.

A new series of indexes are proposed to solve these weaknesses and to improve drought monitoring. In the new indexes, daily, rather than monthly, time steps are used. A new concept, effective precipitation (EP), the summed value of daily precipitation with a time-dependent reduction function, is proposed as a basic tool.

Three additional indexes complement EP. The first index is each day’s mean of EP (MEP). This index shows climatological characteristics of precipitation as a water resource for a station or area. The second index is the deviation of EP (DEP) from the MEP. The third index is the standardized value of DEP (SEP). By using these three indexes, consecutive days of negative SEP, which can show the onset, the ending date, and the duration of a water deficit period is categorized.

With the duration categorized, four additional indexes that can show drought severity are calculated: 1) accumulation of consecutive negative SEP, which shows the duration and severity of precipitation deficit together;2) accumulated precipitation deficit, which shows precipitation departure from the normal during a defined period; 3) precipitation for the return to normal; and 4) effective drought index, a standardized index that can be used to assess drought severity worldwide. The merits and weaknesses of each index are compared. New quantified definitions on drought and its onset, end, and duration are proposed.

These indexes were tested in the High Plains region of the United States from 1960 to 1996. The results were compared to historical reports of drought. From this analysis, it was concluded that the new indexes not only advanced objectivity, but also offered a number of advantages in practical use. These are 1) a more precise determination of drought duration, 2) the usefulness in monitoring an ongoing drought, and 3) the variety of ways a drought’s characteristics can be described.

Corresponding author address: Prof. Hi-Ryong Byun, Department of Environmental Atmospheric Sciences, College of Marine Sciences, Pukyong National University, Namku, Pusan, 608-737, South Korea.

Email: byun@dolphin.pknu.ac.kr

Abstract

Common weaknesses of current drought indexes were analyzed. First, most of the current indexes are not precise enough in detecting the onset, end, and accumulated stress of drought. Second, they do not effectively take into account the aggravating effects of runoff and evapotranspiration, which build up with time. Third, they have a limited usefulness in monitoring ongoing drought because they are based on a monthly time step. Fourth, most of them fail to differentiate the effects of drought on surface and subsurface water supply.

A new series of indexes are proposed to solve these weaknesses and to improve drought monitoring. In the new indexes, daily, rather than monthly, time steps are used. A new concept, effective precipitation (EP), the summed value of daily precipitation with a time-dependent reduction function, is proposed as a basic tool.

Three additional indexes complement EP. The first index is each day’s mean of EP (MEP). This index shows climatological characteristics of precipitation as a water resource for a station or area. The second index is the deviation of EP (DEP) from the MEP. The third index is the standardized value of DEP (SEP). By using these three indexes, consecutive days of negative SEP, which can show the onset, the ending date, and the duration of a water deficit period is categorized.

With the duration categorized, four additional indexes that can show drought severity are calculated: 1) accumulation of consecutive negative SEP, which shows the duration and severity of precipitation deficit together;2) accumulated precipitation deficit, which shows precipitation departure from the normal during a defined period; 3) precipitation for the return to normal; and 4) effective drought index, a standardized index that can be used to assess drought severity worldwide. The merits and weaknesses of each index are compared. New quantified definitions on drought and its onset, end, and duration are proposed.

These indexes were tested in the High Plains region of the United States from 1960 to 1996. The results were compared to historical reports of drought. From this analysis, it was concluded that the new indexes not only advanced objectivity, but also offered a number of advantages in practical use. These are 1) a more precise determination of drought duration, 2) the usefulness in monitoring an ongoing drought, and 3) the variety of ways a drought’s characteristics can be described.

Corresponding author address: Prof. Hi-Ryong Byun, Department of Environmental Atmospheric Sciences, College of Marine Sciences, Pukyong National University, Namku, Pusan, 608-737, South Korea.

Email: byun@dolphin.pknu.ac.kr

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