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The SCAR READER Project: Toward a High-Quality Database of Mean Antarctic Meteorological Observations

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  • * British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • | + College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
  • | # Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom
  • | @ Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, Saint Petersburg, Russia
  • | & National Climate Centre, Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • | ** Department of Dynamical Meteorology, Main Geophysical Observatory, Saint Petersburg, Russia
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Abstract

A new dataset of monthly and annual mean near-surface climate data (temperature, surface and mean sea level pressure, and wind speed) for the Antarctic region has been created using historical observations [Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Reference Antarctic Data for Environmental Research (READER)]. Where possible, 6-hourly surface synoptic and automatic weather station observations were used to compute the means. The ability to quality control the data at the level of individual observations has produced a more accurate series of monthly means than was available previously. At the time of writing, the mean data are available on the Internet (http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/programs-hosted.html). Data for 43 surface-staffed stations and 61 automatic weather stations are included in the database. Here, mean temperature, pressure, and wind speed data for 19 occupied stations with long records are provided.

Corresponding author address: John Turner, British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OET, United Kingdom. Email: j.turner@bas.ac.uk

Abstract

A new dataset of monthly and annual mean near-surface climate data (temperature, surface and mean sea level pressure, and wind speed) for the Antarctic region has been created using historical observations [Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Reference Antarctic Data for Environmental Research (READER)]. Where possible, 6-hourly surface synoptic and automatic weather station observations were used to compute the means. The ability to quality control the data at the level of individual observations has produced a more accurate series of monthly means than was available previously. At the time of writing, the mean data are available on the Internet (http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/programs-hosted.html). Data for 43 surface-staffed stations and 61 automatic weather stations are included in the database. Here, mean temperature, pressure, and wind speed data for 19 occupied stations with long records are provided.

Corresponding author address: John Turner, British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OET, United Kingdom. Email: j.turner@bas.ac.uk

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