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  • 1 Earth System Science Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama
  • | 2 NOAA/NESDIS, Camp Springs, Maryland
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Introduction

Bonfils et al. (2007, hereafter BDL) question our hypothesis (Christy et al. 2006, hereafter CNRG) that irrigation is largely responsible for the positive summer trends in nighttime temperatures of the San Joaquin Valley. We based our hypothesis on a comparison of the trends in the valley with those in the adjacent but nonirrigated Sierra Nevada foothills and mountains (Sierras) since 1910. If the warming trend in the valley is caused by a pervasive forcing mechanism such as increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, then a warming trend would likely also occur in

Introduction

Bonfils et al. (2007, hereafter BDL) question our hypothesis (Christy et al. 2006, hereafter CNRG) that irrigation is largely responsible for the positive summer trends in nighttime temperatures of the San Joaquin Valley. We based our hypothesis on a comparison of the trends in the valley with those in the adjacent but nonirrigated Sierra Nevada foothills and mountains (Sierras) since 1910. If the warming trend in the valley is caused by a pervasive forcing mechanism such as increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, then a warming trend would likely also occur in

Corresponding author address: John R. Christy, Director, Earth System Science Center, Cramer Hall, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899. Email: Christy@nsstc.uah.edu

Introduction

Bonfils et al. (2007, hereafter BDL) question our hypothesis (Christy et al. 2006, hereafter CNRG) that irrigation is largely responsible for the positive summer trends in nighttime temperatures of the San Joaquin Valley. We based our hypothesis on a comparison of the trends in the valley with those in the adjacent but nonirrigated Sierra Nevada foothills and mountains (Sierras) since 1910. If the warming trend in the valley is caused by a pervasive forcing mechanism such as increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, then a warming trend would likely also occur in

Introduction

Bonfils et al. (2007, hereafter BDL) question our hypothesis (Christy et al. 2006, hereafter CNRG) that irrigation is largely responsible for the positive summer trends in nighttime temperatures of the San Joaquin Valley. We based our hypothesis on a comparison of the trends in the valley with those in the adjacent but nonirrigated Sierra Nevada foothills and mountains (Sierras) since 1910. If the warming trend in the valley is caused by a pervasive forcing mechanism such as increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, then a warming trend would likely also occur in

Corresponding author address: John R. Christy, Director, Earth System Science Center, Cramer Hall, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899. Email: Christy@nsstc.uah.edu

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