• Bergman, J. W., and M. L. Salby, 1996: Diurnal variations of cloud cover and their relationship to climatological conditions. J. Climate, 9 , 28022820.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cairns, B., 1995: Diurnal variations of cloud from ISCCP data. Atmos. Res., 37 , 133146.

  • Chen, S. S., and R. A. Houze, 1997: Diurnal variation and life-cycle of deep convective systems over the tropical Pacific warm pool. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 123 , 357388.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Duvel, J. P., 1989: Convection of tropical Africa and the Atlantic variations. Mon. Wea. Rev., 117 , 27822799.

  • Gray, W. M., and R. W. Jacobson, 1977: Diurnal variation of deep cumulus convection. Mon. Wea. Rev., 105 , 11711188.

  • Heidinger, A. K., and M. J. Pavolonis, 2005: Global daytime distribution of overlapping cirrus cloud from NOAA’s Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. J. Climate, 18 , 47724784.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hendon, H. H., and K. Woodberry, 1993: The diurnal cycle of tropical convection. J. Geophys. Res., 98 , D9. 1662316637.

  • Houze, R. A., and A. K. Betts, 1981: Convection in GATE. Rev. Geophys. Space Phys., 19 , 541576.

  • Jin, Y., W. B. Rossow, and D. P. Wylie, 1996: Comparison of the climatologies of high-level clouds from HIRS and ISCCP. J. Climate, 9 , 28502879.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Kondragunta, C. R., 1996: Seasonal and annual variability of the diurnal cycle of clouds. J. Geophys. Res., 101 , D16. 2137721390.

  • Kondragunta, C. R., and A. Gruber, 1994: Diurnal variation of the ISCCP cloudiness. Geophys. Res. Lett., 21 , 18. 20152018.

  • Pavolonis, M. J., A. K. Heidinger, and T. Uttal, 2005: Daytime global cloud typing from AVHRR and VIIRS: Algorithm description, validation, and comparisons. J. Appl. Meteor., 44 , 804826.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rossow, W. B., and R. A. Schiffer, 1999: Advances in understanding clouds from the ISCCP. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 80 , 22612287.

  • Stubenrauch, C. J., W. B. Rossow, F. Chéruy, N. A. Scott, and A. Chédin, 1999a: Clouds as seen by satellite sounders (3I) and imagers (ISCCP). Part I: Evaluation of cloud parameters. J. Climate, 12 , 21892213.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stubenrauch, C. J., A. Chédin, R. Armante, and N. A. Scott, 1999b: Clouds as seen by satellite sounders (3I) and imagers (ISCCP). Part II: A new approach for cloud parameter determination in the 3I algorithms. J. Climate, 12 , 22142223.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stubenrauch, C. J., W. B. Rossow, N. A. Scott, and A. Chédin, 1999c: Clouds as seen by satellite sounders (3I) and imagers (ISCCP). Part III: Combining 3I cloud parameters and ISCCP for better understanding of cloud radiative effects. J. Climate, 12 , 34193442.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Susskind, J., P. Piraio, L. Rokke, L. Iredell, and A. Mehta, 1997: Characteristics of the TOVS Pathfinder Path A dataset. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 78 , 14491472.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Thomas, S. M., A. K. Heidinger, and M. J. Pavolonis, 2004: Comparison of NOAA’s operational AVHRR-derived cloud amount to other satellite-derived cloud climatologies. J. Climate, 17 , 48054822.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wylie, D. P., and W. P. Menzel, 1999: Eight years of high cloud statistics using HIRS. J. Climate, 12 , 170184.

  • Wylie, D. P., and H. M. Woolf, 2002: The diurnal cycle of upper tropospheric clouds measured by GOES-VAS and the ISCCP. Mon. Wea. Rev., 130 , 171179.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wylie, D. P., W. P. Menzel, and K. I. Strabala, 1994: Four years of global cirrus cloud statistics using HIRS. J. Climate, 7 , 19721986.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wylie, D. P., D. L. Jackson, W. P. Menzel, and J. J. Bates, 2005: Trends in global cloud cover in two decades of HIRS observations. J. Climate, 18 , 30213031.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 26 26 26
PDF Downloads 0 0 0

Diurnal Cycles of Clouds and How They Affect Polar-Orbiting Satellite Data

View More View Less
  • 1 Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
Restricted access

Abstract

Diurnal cycles of clouds were investigated using the NOAA series of polar-orbiting satellites. These satellites provided four observations per day for a continuous 11-yr period from 1986 to 1997. The High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) multispectral infrared data were used from the time trend analysis of Wylie et al. The previous study restricted its discussion to only the polar orbiters making observations at 0200 and 1400 LT because gaps in coverage occurred in the 0800 and 2000 LT coverage. This study shows diurnal cycles in cloud cover over 10% in amplitude in many regions, which is very similar to other studies that used geostationary satellite data. The use of only one of the polar-orbiting satellites by Wylie et al. caused biases up to 5% in small regions but in general they were small (e.g., ≤2% for most of the earth). The only consistently large bias was in high cloud cover over land in North America, Europe, and Asia north of 35°N latitude in the summer season where the 0200 and 1400 LT average high cloud frequency was 2%–5% more than the daily average. This occurred only in the summer season, not in the winter.

Corresponding author address: Donald Wylie, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706. Email: don.wylie@ssec.wisc.edu

This article included in the Understanding Diurnal Variability of Precipitation through Observations and Models (UDVPOM) special collection.

Abstract

Diurnal cycles of clouds were investigated using the NOAA series of polar-orbiting satellites. These satellites provided four observations per day for a continuous 11-yr period from 1986 to 1997. The High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) multispectral infrared data were used from the time trend analysis of Wylie et al. The previous study restricted its discussion to only the polar orbiters making observations at 0200 and 1400 LT because gaps in coverage occurred in the 0800 and 2000 LT coverage. This study shows diurnal cycles in cloud cover over 10% in amplitude in many regions, which is very similar to other studies that used geostationary satellite data. The use of only one of the polar-orbiting satellites by Wylie et al. caused biases up to 5% in small regions but in general they were small (e.g., ≤2% for most of the earth). The only consistently large bias was in high cloud cover over land in North America, Europe, and Asia north of 35°N latitude in the summer season where the 0200 and 1400 LT average high cloud frequency was 2%–5% more than the daily average. This occurred only in the summer season, not in the winter.

Corresponding author address: Donald Wylie, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706. Email: don.wylie@ssec.wisc.edu

This article included in the Understanding Diurnal Variability of Precipitation through Observations and Models (UDVPOM) special collection.

Save