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Understanding the Equatorial Pacific Cold Tongue Time-Mean Heat Budget. Part II: Evaluation of the GFDL-FLOR Coupled GCM

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  • 1 Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey
  • | 2 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey
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Abstract

The heat budget of the Pacific equatorial cold tongue (ECT) is explored using the GFDL-FLOR coupled GCM (the forecast-oriented low ocean resolution version of CM2.5) and ocean reanalyses, leveraging the two-layer framework developed in Part I. Despite FLOR’s relatively weak meridional stirring by tropical instability waves (TIWs), the model maintains a reasonable SST and thermocline depth in the ECT via two compensating biases: 1) enhanced monthly-scale vertical advective cooling below the surface mixed layer (SML), due to overly cyclonic off-equatorial wind stress that acts to cool the equatorial source waters; and 2) an excessive SST contrast between the ECT and off-equator areas, which boosts the equatorward heat transport by TIWs. FLOR’s strong advective cooling at the SML base is compensated by strong downward diffusion of heat out of the SML, which then allows FLOR’s ECT to take up a realistic heat flux from the atmosphere. Correcting FLOR’s climatological SST and wind stress biases via flux adjustment (FA) leads to weaker deep advective cooling of the ECT, which then erodes the upper-ocean thermal stratification, enhances vertical mixing, and excessively deepens the thermocline. FA does strengthen FLOR’s meridional shear of the zonal currents in the east Pacific, but this does not amplify either the simulated TIWs or their equatorward heat transport, likely due to FLOR’s coarse zonal ocean resolution. The analysis suggests that to advance coupled simulations of the ECT, improved winds and surface heat fluxes must go hand in hand with improved subseasonal and parameterized ocean processes. Implications for model development and the tropical Pacific observing system are discussed.

© 2018 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

This article has a companion article which can be found at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0152.1

Corresponding author: Sulagna Ray, sulagna.ray@gmail.com

Abstract

The heat budget of the Pacific equatorial cold tongue (ECT) is explored using the GFDL-FLOR coupled GCM (the forecast-oriented low ocean resolution version of CM2.5) and ocean reanalyses, leveraging the two-layer framework developed in Part I. Despite FLOR’s relatively weak meridional stirring by tropical instability waves (TIWs), the model maintains a reasonable SST and thermocline depth in the ECT via two compensating biases: 1) enhanced monthly-scale vertical advective cooling below the surface mixed layer (SML), due to overly cyclonic off-equatorial wind stress that acts to cool the equatorial source waters; and 2) an excessive SST contrast between the ECT and off-equator areas, which boosts the equatorward heat transport by TIWs. FLOR’s strong advective cooling at the SML base is compensated by strong downward diffusion of heat out of the SML, which then allows FLOR’s ECT to take up a realistic heat flux from the atmosphere. Correcting FLOR’s climatological SST and wind stress biases via flux adjustment (FA) leads to weaker deep advective cooling of the ECT, which then erodes the upper-ocean thermal stratification, enhances vertical mixing, and excessively deepens the thermocline. FA does strengthen FLOR’s meridional shear of the zonal currents in the east Pacific, but this does not amplify either the simulated TIWs or their equatorward heat transport, likely due to FLOR’s coarse zonal ocean resolution. The analysis suggests that to advance coupled simulations of the ECT, improved winds and surface heat fluxes must go hand in hand with improved subseasonal and parameterized ocean processes. Implications for model development and the tropical Pacific observing system are discussed.

© 2018 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

This article has a companion article which can be found at http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0152.1

Corresponding author: Sulagna Ray, sulagna.ray@gmail.com
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