Dynamic control of the dominant modes of interannual variability of snowfall frequency in China

View More View Less
  • 1 Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters/Key Laboratory of Meteorological Disasters, Ministry of Education/Joint International Research Laboratory of Climate and Environment Change, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China
  • 2 Nansen Zhu International Research Centre, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • 3 Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory, Zhuhai, China
  • 4 Anhui Climate Centre, Hefei, China
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

This study investigates 16 the first two leading modes of the interannual variability of frequency of snowfall events (FSE) over China in the winter during 1986–2018. The positive phase of the first leading mode (EOF1) is mainly characterized by positive FSE anomalies in northeastern-northwestern China and negative FSE anomalies in the three-river-source region. In contrast, the positive phase of the second leading mode (EOF2) is mainly characterized by positive FSE anomalies in central eastern China (CEC). The EOF1 is affected by the synoptic-scale wave activity over the mid-latitudes of the East Asian continent, where active synoptic-scale wave activity over the mid-latitudes may cause increased FSE over northeastern-northwestern China, and vice versa. In a winter of a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, an anomalous deep cold low may occur over Siberia, which may induce increased meridional air temperature gradient, increased atmospheric baroclinicity, and hence increased FSE over the mid-latitudes of the East Asian continent. The EOF2 is affected by the interaction between anomalous northerly cold advection and anomalous southerly water vapor transport over CEC. The positive phase of EOF2 is associated with negative sea ice anomalies in the Barents Sea-Kara sea region and negative sea surface temperature anomalies in the central-eastern tropical Pacific. Reduced sea ice in the Barents Sea-Kara Sea during January–February may cause increased northerly cold advection over CEC, while a La Niña-like condition during January may induce southerly water vapor transport anomalies over CEC.

Corresponding author: Bo Sun, email: sunb@nuist.edu.cn

Abstract

This study investigates 16 the first two leading modes of the interannual variability of frequency of snowfall events (FSE) over China in the winter during 1986–2018. The positive phase of the first leading mode (EOF1) is mainly characterized by positive FSE anomalies in northeastern-northwestern China and negative FSE anomalies in the three-river-source region. In contrast, the positive phase of the second leading mode (EOF2) is mainly characterized by positive FSE anomalies in central eastern China (CEC). The EOF1 is affected by the synoptic-scale wave activity over the mid-latitudes of the East Asian continent, where active synoptic-scale wave activity over the mid-latitudes may cause increased FSE over northeastern-northwestern China, and vice versa. In a winter of a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation, an anomalous deep cold low may occur over Siberia, which may induce increased meridional air temperature gradient, increased atmospheric baroclinicity, and hence increased FSE over the mid-latitudes of the East Asian continent. The EOF2 is affected by the interaction between anomalous northerly cold advection and anomalous southerly water vapor transport over CEC. The positive phase of EOF2 is associated with negative sea ice anomalies in the Barents Sea-Kara sea region and negative sea surface temperature anomalies in the central-eastern tropical Pacific. Reduced sea ice in the Barents Sea-Kara Sea during January–February may cause increased northerly cold advection over CEC, while a La Niña-like condition during January may induce southerly water vapor transport anomalies over CEC.

Corresponding author: Bo Sun, email: sunb@nuist.edu.cn
Save