Impacts of Greenland Ice Sheet on Blocking in Idealized Simulations

Hairu Ding aDepartment of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China

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Li Dong aDepartment of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
bAcademy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China

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Kaijun Liu aDepartment of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China

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Ting Lin aDepartment of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China

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Zhiang Xie aDepartment of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China

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Bo Zhang aDepartment of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China

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Xiaoxue Wang cInstitute of Oceanography, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

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Abstract

As the only remaining ice sheet in the Northern Hemisphere, the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) plays a crucial role in influencing atmospheric circulations, particularly with its rapid melting under global warming. In this paper, the influences of GrIS topography and surface thermal conditions are investigated by a series of aquaplanet experiments. The results show that the GrIS topography induces stationary waves and favors more blocking events through the generation of negative potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, while it tends to suppress local storm activities through the induced stationary waves. The surface cooling center of the GrIS is found to strengthen the jet streams by enhancing the meridional temperature gradient and thermal wind, while it causes the PV and static stability to increase during near-Greenland blocking days, thereby disfavoring blocking onset. Altogether, the topography and surface thermal effects of GrIS appear to compete with each other so that the net effect would determine the final response. Nevertheless, nonlinearity is found in both GrIS-topography alone and GrIS-surface temperature alone experiments, where nonlinear responses of atmospheric circulation are detected when the GrIS topography height or surface temperature exceeds their critical values, respectively. Hence, through this study, the response of the blocking in the vicinity of Greenland to the combined effects of topography and surface thermal conditions may shed light on comprehending the underlying mechanism of blocking aleration in a changing climate.

© 2024 American Meteorological Society. This is an Author Accepted Manuscript distributed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Hairu Ding’s current affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany.

Ting Lin’s current affiliation: Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Corresponding author: Li Dong, dongl@sustech.edu.cn

Abstract

As the only remaining ice sheet in the Northern Hemisphere, the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) plays a crucial role in influencing atmospheric circulations, particularly with its rapid melting under global warming. In this paper, the influences of GrIS topography and surface thermal conditions are investigated by a series of aquaplanet experiments. The results show that the GrIS topography induces stationary waves and favors more blocking events through the generation of negative potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, while it tends to suppress local storm activities through the induced stationary waves. The surface cooling center of the GrIS is found to strengthen the jet streams by enhancing the meridional temperature gradient and thermal wind, while it causes the PV and static stability to increase during near-Greenland blocking days, thereby disfavoring blocking onset. Altogether, the topography and surface thermal effects of GrIS appear to compete with each other so that the net effect would determine the final response. Nevertheless, nonlinearity is found in both GrIS-topography alone and GrIS-surface temperature alone experiments, where nonlinear responses of atmospheric circulation are detected when the GrIS topography height or surface temperature exceeds their critical values, respectively. Hence, through this study, the response of the blocking in the vicinity of Greenland to the combined effects of topography and surface thermal conditions may shed light on comprehending the underlying mechanism of blocking aleration in a changing climate.

© 2024 American Meteorological Society. This is an Author Accepted Manuscript distributed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Hairu Ding’s current affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany.

Ting Lin’s current affiliation: Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

Corresponding author: Li Dong, dongl@sustech.edu.cn
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