Impact of the Tibetan Plateau on Global High-frequency Temperature Variability

Zifan Su aCollaborative Innovation Center for Western Ecological Safety, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China
bCollege of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China

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Yongkun Xie aCollaborative Innovation Center for Western Ecological Safety, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China

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Jianping Huang aCollaborative Innovation Center for Western Ecological Safety, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China

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Guoxiong Wu cState Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
dCollege of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

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Yuzhi Liu aCollaborative Innovation Center for Western Ecological Safety, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China

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Xiaodan Guan aCollaborative Innovation Center for Western Ecological Safety, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China

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Abstract

The Tibetan Plateau’s (TP) topography has long been recognized for its impact on climate. However, recognition of the influence of the TP on global weather variability remains insufficient. Therefore, this study used numerical simulations to demonstrate the influences of the TP and its mechanical and thermal forcing on global high-frequency temperature variability and eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Despite local influences, the TP influenced the high-frequency temperature variability in far-flung regions like North America. In summer, the TP’s influence on high-frequency temperature variability showed dipole patterns in Eurasia and tripole patterns in North America, which were mainly induced by TP thermal forcing. In winter, the TP’s influence on high-frequency temperature variability was dominated by mechanical forcing and was less significant for remote regions than in summer. Mechanical forcing dominated EKE in both summer and winter. Furthermore, the horizontal temperature advection dominated the TP’s influence on high-frequency temperature variability for both its thermal effect in summer and its mechanical effect in winter, wherein EKE, as the dynamical factor, determined the horizontal temperature advection rather than the thermodynamical factor, the temperature gradient. Our findings suggest that the TP, via its mechanical and thermal forcing, may have an impact on temperature-related weather extremes around the world.

© 2024 American Meteorological Society. This is an Author Accepted Manuscript distributed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Yongkun Xie, xieyk@lzu.edu.cn

Abstract

The Tibetan Plateau’s (TP) topography has long been recognized for its impact on climate. However, recognition of the influence of the TP on global weather variability remains insufficient. Therefore, this study used numerical simulations to demonstrate the influences of the TP and its mechanical and thermal forcing on global high-frequency temperature variability and eddy kinetic energy (EKE). Despite local influences, the TP influenced the high-frequency temperature variability in far-flung regions like North America. In summer, the TP’s influence on high-frequency temperature variability showed dipole patterns in Eurasia and tripole patterns in North America, which were mainly induced by TP thermal forcing. In winter, the TP’s influence on high-frequency temperature variability was dominated by mechanical forcing and was less significant for remote regions than in summer. Mechanical forcing dominated EKE in both summer and winter. Furthermore, the horizontal temperature advection dominated the TP’s influence on high-frequency temperature variability for both its thermal effect in summer and its mechanical effect in winter, wherein EKE, as the dynamical factor, determined the horizontal temperature advection rather than the thermodynamical factor, the temperature gradient. Our findings suggest that the TP, via its mechanical and thermal forcing, may have an impact on temperature-related weather extremes around the world.

© 2024 American Meteorological Society. This is an Author Accepted Manuscript distributed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Yongkun Xie, xieyk@lzu.edu.cn
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