• Abudulai, S. 1996. Perceptions of land rights, rural-urban land-use dynamics and policy development,. in Managing Land Tenure and Resource Access in West Africa, Proceedings of a regional workshop, Goree, Senegal, International Institute for Environment and Development (UK), Groupe de Recherche et d'Echanges Technologiques (GRET), 18–22 November 1996, 107–127.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Baker, W. L. 1989. A review of models of landscape change. Landscape Ecol. 2:111133.

  • Bell, E. J. and R. C. Hinojosa. 1977. Markov analysis of land use change: Continuous time and stationary processes. Socio-Econ. Plann. Sci. 11:1317.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bockstael, N. E. 1996. Modeling economics and ecology: The importance of a spatial perspective. Am. J. Agric. Econ. 78:11681180.

  • Braimoh, A. K. 2003. Seasonal migration and land-use change in Northern Ghana. Land Degrad. Dev., in press.

  • Brown, D. G., B. C. Pijanowski, and J. D. Duh. 2000. Modeling the relationship between land use and land cover on private lands in the Upper Midwest, USA. J. Environ. Manage. 59:247263.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brown, D. G., P. Goovaerts, A. Burnicki, and M. Y. Li. 2002. Stochastic simulation of land-cover change using geostatistics and generalized additive models. Photogramm. Eng. Remote Sens. 68:(10), 10511061.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Clarke, K. C. and L. Gaydos. 1998. Loose-coupling a cellular automaton model and GIS: Long-term urban growth prediction for San Francisco and Washington/Baltimore. Int. J. Geogr. Info. Sci. 12:(7), 699714.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ghana Statistical Service 1989. 1984 population census of Ghana. Special report on localities by local authorities, Ghana Statistical Service, Accra, Ghana.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ghana Statistical Service 2002. 2000 population and housing census. Special report on 20 largest localities, Ghana Statistical Service, Accra, Ghana.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Hall, F. G., D. E. Strebel, J. E. Nickeson, and S. J. Goetz. 1991. Radiometric rectification: Toward a common radiometric response among multidate, multisensor images. Remote Sens. Environ. 35:1127.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Irwin, E. G. and J. Geoghegan. 2001. Theory, data, methods: Developing spatially-explicit economic models of land use change. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 84:(1–3),. 724.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lambin, E. F. 1994. Modelling deforestation processes: A review. TREES Series B, Research Rep. 1, EUR 15744 EN, European Commission, Brussels, Belgium, 113 pp.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lambin, E. F. 1997. Modelling and monitoring land-cover change processes in tropical regions. Prog. Phys. Geogr. 21:(3), 375393.

  • Mills, E. S. 1967. An aggregative model of resource allocation in a metropolitan area. Am. Econ. Rev. 57:197210.

  • Muller, M. R. and J. Middleton. 1994. A Markov model of land-use change dynamics in the Niagara Region, Ontario, Canada. Landscape Ecol. 9:(2), 151157.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pontius, R. G,Jr and L. Schneider. 2001. Land-use change model validation by a ROC method for the Ipswich watershed, Massachusetts, USA. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 85.(1–3), 239–248.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rees, W. 1992. Ecological footprints and appropriated carrying capacity: What urban economics leaves out. Environ. Urban. 4:(2), 121130.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Turner, M. G. 1987. Spatial simulation of landscape changes in Georgia: A comparison of three transition models. Landscape Ecol. 1:2936.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • van Ittersum, M. K., R. Rabbinge, and H. C. van Latesteijn. 1998. Explorative land use studies and their role in strategic policy making. Agric. Syst. 58:309330.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Bank 1995. World Development Report, 1995. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 251 pp.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 169 94 0
PDF Downloads 91 57 0

Land-Cover Dynamics in an Urban Area of Ghana

View More View Less
  • 1 Center for Development Research, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
Restricted access

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to quantify land-cover changes. A short-term projection of land-cover distribution in a 2400-ha (1 ha = 10 000 m2 ) area of northern Ghana was generated. Landsat Thematic Mapper images acquired in 1984, 1992, and 1999 were used for land-cover mapping, whereas land-cover projections were carried out using transition probability techniques. Remote sensing analyses showed that in the first period (1984–92), the dominant land-cover change process was the expansion of the built-up area (26 ha yr−1) as a result of an increase in demand for housing by the increasing population. Expansion of the built-up area continued at the rate of 35 ha yr−1 in the second period (1992–99), as well as development of peri-urban agriculture (24 ha yr−1) to meet the food demand of the rapidly growing population. Projection of land-cover distribution showed that the built-up area would further increase at the expense of cropland and natural vegetation, covering about 39% of the landscape by 2006. Policy implications of this trend are discussed.

This paper is part of a special theme issue on land use and ecosystems.

*Corresponding author address: Ademola K. Braimoh, Center for Development Research (ZEFc), University of Bonn Walter Flex Str 3, D-53113 Bonn, Germany. abraimoh@uni-bonn.de

This article included in Land Use and Ecosystems special collection.

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to quantify land-cover changes. A short-term projection of land-cover distribution in a 2400-ha (1 ha = 10 000 m2 ) area of northern Ghana was generated. Landsat Thematic Mapper images acquired in 1984, 1992, and 1999 were used for land-cover mapping, whereas land-cover projections were carried out using transition probability techniques. Remote sensing analyses showed that in the first period (1984–92), the dominant land-cover change process was the expansion of the built-up area (26 ha yr−1) as a result of an increase in demand for housing by the increasing population. Expansion of the built-up area continued at the rate of 35 ha yr−1 in the second period (1992–99), as well as development of peri-urban agriculture (24 ha yr−1) to meet the food demand of the rapidly growing population. Projection of land-cover distribution showed that the built-up area would further increase at the expense of cropland and natural vegetation, covering about 39% of the landscape by 2006. Policy implications of this trend are discussed.

This paper is part of a special theme issue on land use and ecosystems.

*Corresponding author address: Ademola K. Braimoh, Center for Development Research (ZEFc), University of Bonn Walter Flex Str 3, D-53113 Bonn, Germany. abraimoh@uni-bonn.de

This article included in Land Use and Ecosystems special collection.

Save