The Effect of Convective/Advective Precipitation Partitions on the Precipitation Isotopes in the Monsoon Regions of China: A Case Study of Changsha

Zhuoyong Xiao aCollege of Geographic Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China

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Xinping Zhang aCollege of Geographic Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China
bKey Laboratory of Geospatial Big Data Mining and Applications in Hunan Province, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China

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Xiong Xiao aCollege of Geographic Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China
cState Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing, China

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Xin Chang aCollege of Geographic Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China

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Xinguang He aCollege of Geographic Sciences, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China
bKey Laboratory of Geospatial Big Data Mining and Applications in Hunan Province, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China

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Abstract

Convective/advective precipitation partitions refer to the divisions of precipitation that are either convective or advective in nature, relative to the total precipitation amount. These distinct partitions can have a significant influence on the stable isotope composition of precipitation. This study analyzed and compared the effect of precipitation partitions on δ18O in precipitation (δ18Op) by using daily precipitation stable isotope data from Changsha station and monthly precipitation stable isotope data from the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP), under different time scales, time intervals (i.e., annual, warm season, and cold season), and precipitation intensities. The results showed that the correlation between the convective precipitation fraction (CPF) and total precipitation amount was influenced by the intensity of convection in different time intervals. On both the daily and monthly scales, the CPF decreased as the precipitation amount increased in the warm season, while it increased with increasing precipitation amount in the cold season. Regardless of the season, daily δ18Op at Changsha station consistently increased with an increase in daily CPF. On a daily scale, the effect of convective activity on δ18Op was stronger than that of the “precipitation amount effect” in the cold season, as compared to the situation in the warm season. As a result, the regression line slope between δ18Op and CPF increased with increasing precipitation intensity in the warm season, meaning that as the CPF increased, the δ18Op increased at a faster rate under higher precipitation intensity. Similarly, the slope increased with increasing precipitation intensity in the cold season. This suggests that precipitation intensity and convection intensity can affect the relationship between δ18Op and CPF. Our findings shed light on how different precipitation partitions affect stable isotope composition of precipitation, thus enhancing our understanding of the variability of precipitation stable isotopes in the monsoon regions of China.

Significance Statement

This study aims to better elucidate the influence of different precipitation partitions on precipitation stable isotopes. In the eastern monsoon region of China, stable isotopes in precipitation showed a robust positive relationship with convective precipitation faction. On a daily scale, the convective activity enhanced the influences of the “precipitation amount effect” on precipitation stable isotopes in the warm season and reduced such influences in the cold season. These results improve our understanding of stable isotopic variability of precipitation in the eastern monsoon region, China.

© 2024 American Meteorological Society. This published article is licensed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding authors: Xinping Zhang, zxp@hunnu.edu.cn; Xiong Xiao, xiaoxiong@hunnu.edu.cn

Abstract

Convective/advective precipitation partitions refer to the divisions of precipitation that are either convective or advective in nature, relative to the total precipitation amount. These distinct partitions can have a significant influence on the stable isotope composition of precipitation. This study analyzed and compared the effect of precipitation partitions on δ18O in precipitation (δ18Op) by using daily precipitation stable isotope data from Changsha station and monthly precipitation stable isotope data from the Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP), under different time scales, time intervals (i.e., annual, warm season, and cold season), and precipitation intensities. The results showed that the correlation between the convective precipitation fraction (CPF) and total precipitation amount was influenced by the intensity of convection in different time intervals. On both the daily and monthly scales, the CPF decreased as the precipitation amount increased in the warm season, while it increased with increasing precipitation amount in the cold season. Regardless of the season, daily δ18Op at Changsha station consistently increased with an increase in daily CPF. On a daily scale, the effect of convective activity on δ18Op was stronger than that of the “precipitation amount effect” in the cold season, as compared to the situation in the warm season. As a result, the regression line slope between δ18Op and CPF increased with increasing precipitation intensity in the warm season, meaning that as the CPF increased, the δ18Op increased at a faster rate under higher precipitation intensity. Similarly, the slope increased with increasing precipitation intensity in the cold season. This suggests that precipitation intensity and convection intensity can affect the relationship between δ18Op and CPF. Our findings shed light on how different precipitation partitions affect stable isotope composition of precipitation, thus enhancing our understanding of the variability of precipitation stable isotopes in the monsoon regions of China.

Significance Statement

This study aims to better elucidate the influence of different precipitation partitions on precipitation stable isotopes. In the eastern monsoon region of China, stable isotopes in precipitation showed a robust positive relationship with convective precipitation faction. On a daily scale, the convective activity enhanced the influences of the “precipitation amount effect” on precipitation stable isotopes in the warm season and reduced such influences in the cold season. These results improve our understanding of stable isotopic variability of precipitation in the eastern monsoon region, China.

© 2024 American Meteorological Society. This published article is licensed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding authors: Xinping Zhang, zxp@hunnu.edu.cn; Xiong Xiao, xiaoxiong@hunnu.edu.cn
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