Supplementary Notes on Sea-Surface Temperature Anomalies and Model-Generated Meteorological Histories

JEROME SPAR Department of Meteorology and Oceanography, New York University, Bronx, N.Y.

Search for other papers by JEROME SPAR in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Abstract

In seasonal computations, the Mints-Arakawa two-level model is found to be sensitive to a minor alteration in the computational program. Effects of the program change on monthly mean sea level pressure fields are small in the first month but large in the second and third months, although the meteorological histories generated by both the original and modified programs are equally credible.

The inherited effects of a transient (1-mo) sea-surface temperature (SST) anomaly on the computed monthly mean sea level pressure fields over a period of a season are about as large in absolute magnitude as those generated in the model by a persistent (seasonal) SST anomaly.

The effects of a transient SST anomaly in the North Pacific Ocean on monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation in the eastern United States may be large enough to produce a change of one or two class intervals in these predicted weather elements. The model-generated precipitation in the equatorial region is also found to be sensitive to the sea-surface temperature field in the North Pacific.

Now at the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The City College, City University of New York, N.Y.

Abstract

In seasonal computations, the Mints-Arakawa two-level model is found to be sensitive to a minor alteration in the computational program. Effects of the program change on monthly mean sea level pressure fields are small in the first month but large in the second and third months, although the meteorological histories generated by both the original and modified programs are equally credible.

The inherited effects of a transient (1-mo) sea-surface temperature (SST) anomaly on the computed monthly mean sea level pressure fields over a period of a season are about as large in absolute magnitude as those generated in the model by a persistent (seasonal) SST anomaly.

The effects of a transient SST anomaly in the North Pacific Ocean on monthly and seasonal temperature and precipitation in the eastern United States may be large enough to produce a change of one or two class intervals in these predicted weather elements. The model-generated precipitation in the equatorial region is also found to be sensitive to the sea-surface temperature field in the North Pacific.

Now at the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The City College, City University of New York, N.Y.

Save