SMS/GOES Visible Images Detect a Synoptic-Scale Air Pollution Episode

View More View Less
  • 1 COMPUMET, Minneapolis, Minn. 55414
  • | 2 Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 63130
© Get Permissions Rent on DeepDyve
Restricted access

Abstract

An SMS/GOES 1 n mi visible image taken an 30 June 1975 reveals a massive area of atmospheric turbidity over the central and eastern United States. This was during the midpoint of a two-week air stagnation episode engulfing the Plains to the East Coast. It is shown that image “haziness” is correlated to midday surface visibility reports, which are in turn possibly correlated to sulfate aerosol concentrations. It appears that geosynchronous satellite data can play a major role in determining the areal extent of sulfate aerosol episodes.

Abstract

An SMS/GOES 1 n mi visible image taken an 30 June 1975 reveals a massive area of atmospheric turbidity over the central and eastern United States. This was during the midpoint of a two-week air stagnation episode engulfing the Plains to the East Coast. It is shown that image “haziness” is correlated to midday surface visibility reports, which are in turn possibly correlated to sulfate aerosol concentrations. It appears that geosynchronous satellite data can play a major role in determining the areal extent of sulfate aerosol episodes.

Save