A Description of the GFDL Global Spectral Model

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  • 1 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/N0AA, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540
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Abstract

A multi-level, global, spectral transform model of the atmosphere, based upon spherical harmonies, has been developed at GFDL. The basic model has nine sigma levels in the vertical and rhomboidal spectral truncation at wavenumber 30. However, finer spectral or vertical resolution versions are available as well. The model's efficient semi-implicit time differencing scheme does not appear to adversely affect medium range predictions. The model has physical processes commonly associated with grid point GCM'S. Two unique features are a linearized virtual temperature correction and an optional, spectrally-computed non-linear horizontal diffusion scheme. A parameterization of vertical mixing based upon the turbulent closure method is also optional.

The GFDL spectral model has been widely utilized at GFDL for extended range weather prediction experiments. In addition, it has been adapted and applied to climate studies, four-dimensional data assimilation experiments and even to the atmosphere of Venus. These applications are briefly reviewed.

Abstract

A multi-level, global, spectral transform model of the atmosphere, based upon spherical harmonies, has been developed at GFDL. The basic model has nine sigma levels in the vertical and rhomboidal spectral truncation at wavenumber 30. However, finer spectral or vertical resolution versions are available as well. The model's efficient semi-implicit time differencing scheme does not appear to adversely affect medium range predictions. The model has physical processes commonly associated with grid point GCM'S. Two unique features are a linearized virtual temperature correction and an optional, spectrally-computed non-linear horizontal diffusion scheme. A parameterization of vertical mixing based upon the turbulent closure method is also optional.

The GFDL spectral model has been widely utilized at GFDL for extended range weather prediction experiments. In addition, it has been adapted and applied to climate studies, four-dimensional data assimilation experiments and even to the atmosphere of Venus. These applications are briefly reviewed.

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