All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 63 27 5
PDF Downloads 31 12 3

Comparison of Cirrus Height and Optical Depth Derived from Satellite and Aircraft Measurements

M. KästnerInstitut für der Atmosphäre, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Federal of Germany

Search for other papers by M. Kästner in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
K. T. KriebelInstitut für der Atmosphäre, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Federal of Germany

Search for other papers by K. T. Kriebel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
R. MeerkötterInstitut für der Atmosphäre, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Federal of Germany

Search for other papers by R. Meerkötter in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
W. RengerInstitut für der Atmosphäre, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Federal of Germany

Search for other papers by W. Renger in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
G. H. RuppersbergInstitut für der Atmosphäre, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Federal of Germany

Search for other papers by G. H. Ruppersberg in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
P. WendlingInstitut für der Atmosphäre, Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen, Federal of Germany

Search for other papers by P. Wendling in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Abstract

During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of Cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA polar-orbiting meteorological satellite system have been used together with the algorithm package AVHRR processing scheme over clouds, land and ocean (APOLLO) to derive optical depth. NOAA High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data have been used together with a bispectral technique to derive cloud-top height. Also, the optical depth of some contrails could be estimated. Airborne measurements have been performed simultaneously by using the Airborne Lidar Experiment (ALEX), a back-scatter lidar. Comparison of satellite data with airborne data showed agreement of the top heights to about 500 m and of the optical depths to about 30%. These uncertainties are within the limits obtained from error estimates.

Abstract

During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of Cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA polar-orbiting meteorological satellite system have been used together with the algorithm package AVHRR processing scheme over clouds, land and ocean (APOLLO) to derive optical depth. NOAA High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data have been used together with a bispectral technique to derive cloud-top height. Also, the optical depth of some contrails could be estimated. Airborne measurements have been performed simultaneously by using the Airborne Lidar Experiment (ALEX), a back-scatter lidar. Comparison of satellite data with airborne data showed agreement of the top heights to about 500 m and of the optical depths to about 30%. These uncertainties are within the limits obtained from error estimates.

Save