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Warm Upper-Level Downdrafts Associated with a Squall Line

J. SunDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

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S. BraunDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

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M. I. BiggerstaffDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

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R. G. FovellDepartment of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

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R. A. Houze Jr.Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

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Abstract

Thermodynamic retrieval analysis applied to a composite of dual-Doppler radar data obtained in the 10–11 June 1985 PRE-STORM (Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central) squall line and a model simulation of a similar squall line show that the upper-level downdrafts located ahead of and behind the main convective updraft zone were generally positively buoyant. As a result, the upper-level downdrafts contributed negatively to the system heat flux.

Abstract

Thermodynamic retrieval analysis applied to a composite of dual-Doppler radar data obtained in the 10–11 June 1985 PRE-STORM (Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central) squall line and a model simulation of a similar squall line show that the upper-level downdrafts located ahead of and behind the main convective updraft zone were generally positively buoyant. As a result, the upper-level downdrafts contributed negatively to the system heat flux.

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