• Chan, J. C.-L., 1985: Tropical cyclone activity in the northwest Pacific in relation to the El Niño/Southern Oscillation phenomenon. Mon. Wea. Rev.,113, 599–606.

  • Chen, T.-C., and M.-C. Yen, 1993: Interannual variation of summertime stationary eddies. J. Climate,6, 2263–2277.

  • ——, and S.-P. Weng, 1998: Interannual variation of the summer synoptic-scale disturbance activity in the western tropical Pacific. Mon. Wea. Rev., in press.

  • Dong, K.-Q., 1988: El Niño and tropical cyclone frequency in the Australian region and the northwest Pacific. Aust. Meteor. Mag.,28, 219–225.

  • Frank, W. M., 1987: Tropical cyclone formation. A Global View of Tropical Cyclones, Office of Naval Research. 53–90.

  • Gray, W. M., 1968: Global view of the origin of tropical disturbances and storms. Mon. Wea. Rev.,96, 669–700.

  • ——, 1979: Hurricanes: Their formation, structure and likely role in the tropical circulation. Meteorology over the Tropical Oceans, D. B. Shaw, Ed., Roy. Meteor. Soc., 155–218.

  • Kalnay, E., and Coauthors, 1996: The NCEP/NCAR 40-year reanalysis project. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,77, 437–471.

  • Lander, M. A., 1993: Comments on “A GCM simulation of the relationship between tropical storm formation and ENSO.” Mon. Wea. Rev.,121, 2137–2143.

  • ——, 1994: An exploratory analysis of the relationship between tropical storm formation in the western North Pacific and ENSO. Mon. Wea. Rev.,122, 636–651.

  • Lau, K.-M., and L. Peng, 1992: Dynamics of atmospheric teleconnections during the northern summer. J. Climate,5, 140–158.

  • Lighthill, J., G. Holland, W. Gray, C., Landsea, G. Craig, J. Evans, Y. Kurihara, and C. Guard, 1994: Global climate change and tropical cyclones. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,75, 2147–2157.

  • McBride, J. L., 1995: Tropical cyclone formation. Global Perspective on Tropical Cyclones, WMO/TD-No. 693, World Meteorological Organization, 63–105.

  • Neumann, C. J., 1993: Global overview. Global Guide to Tropical Cyclone Forecasting, World Meteor. Org., 1.1–1.56.

  • Reynolds, R. W., 1988: A real-time global sea surface temperature analysis. J. Climate,1, 75–86.

  • ——, and D. C. Marsico, 1993: An improved real-time global sea surface temperature analysis. J. Climate,6, 114–119.

  • Sadler, J. C., 1967: On the origin of tropical vortices. Proc. Working Panel on Tropical Dynamic Meteorology, Norfolk, VA, Naval Weather Research Facility, 39–75.

  • Wright, P. B., 1985: The Southern Oscillation: An ocean–atmosphere feedback system. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,66, 398–412.

  • Wu, G., and N.-C. Lau, 1992: A GCM simulation of the relationship between tropical-storm formation and ENSO. Mon. Wea. Rev.,120, 958–977.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 172 172 14
PDF Downloads 123 123 16

Interannual Variation in the Tropical Cyclone Formation over the Western North Pacific

View More View Less
  • 1 Atmospheric Science Program, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa
  • | 2 Typhoon Research Department, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan
  • | 3 Atmospheric Science Program, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa
© Get Permissions Rent on DeepDyve
Restricted access

Abstract

The interannual variation in tropical cyclone genesis frequency over the western North Pacific was examined for the active tropical cyclone (including summer and fall) during 1979–94. An emphasis was put on the possible effect of the interannual variation of atmospheric circulation and monsoon trough on tropical cyclone occurrence. The major findings of this study are the following.

  1. A distinct increase (decrease) of tropical cyclone genesis frequency occurs north of the climatological location of the monsoon trough in the Philippine Sea during summers (June–August) with anomalous cold (warm) sea surface temperature (SST) over the NINO3 region. The interannual variation of tropical cyclone genesis in this region results from the appearance of an anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) cell situated in a summer teleconnection wave train emanating from the western tropical Pacific and progressing along the rim of the North Pacific. In addition to the north–south interannual variation, there is also a longitudinal interannual variation in the summer tropical cyclone genesis frequency over this region. The contrast of tropical cyclone genesis between the regions west and east of 150°E is reduced (enhanced) when the monsoon trough extends (retreats) eastward (westward) across this longitude during warm (cold) summers.
  2. For fall (September–November), there is no clear relationship between the north–south interannual variation in the tropical cyclone genesis over the western North Pacific and SST (NINO3). However, there is a perceptible tendency of the longitudinal interannual variation in tropical cyclone genesis frequency to follow the eastward extension/westward retreat of the monsoon trough in a way such as it does during the summer season.

Corresponding author address: Tsing-Chang Chen, Atmospheric Science Program, 3010 Agronomy Hall, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Email: zntcc@climate1.agron.iastate.edu

Abstract

The interannual variation in tropical cyclone genesis frequency over the western North Pacific was examined for the active tropical cyclone (including summer and fall) during 1979–94. An emphasis was put on the possible effect of the interannual variation of atmospheric circulation and monsoon trough on tropical cyclone occurrence. The major findings of this study are the following.

  1. A distinct increase (decrease) of tropical cyclone genesis frequency occurs north of the climatological location of the monsoon trough in the Philippine Sea during summers (June–August) with anomalous cold (warm) sea surface temperature (SST) over the NINO3 region. The interannual variation of tropical cyclone genesis in this region results from the appearance of an anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) cell situated in a summer teleconnection wave train emanating from the western tropical Pacific and progressing along the rim of the North Pacific. In addition to the north–south interannual variation, there is also a longitudinal interannual variation in the summer tropical cyclone genesis frequency over this region. The contrast of tropical cyclone genesis between the regions west and east of 150°E is reduced (enhanced) when the monsoon trough extends (retreats) eastward (westward) across this longitude during warm (cold) summers.
  2. For fall (September–November), there is no clear relationship between the north–south interannual variation in the tropical cyclone genesis over the western North Pacific and SST (NINO3). However, there is a perceptible tendency of the longitudinal interannual variation in tropical cyclone genesis frequency to follow the eastward extension/westward retreat of the monsoon trough in a way such as it does during the summer season.

Corresponding author address: Tsing-Chang Chen, Atmospheric Science Program, 3010 Agronomy Hall, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011.

Email: zntcc@climate1.agron.iastate.edu

Save