Cirriform Rotor Cloud Observed on a Canadian Arctic Ice Cap

Hisashi Ozawa Nagaoka Institute of Snow and Ice Studies, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Nagaoka, Japan

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Kumiko Goto-Azuma Nagaoka Institute of Snow and Ice Studies, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Nagaoka, Japan

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Koyuru Iwanami Nagaoka Institute of Snow and Ice Studies, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Nagaoka, Japan

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Roy M. Koerner Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

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Abstract

A thin rotor cloud was observed on the lee side of Penny Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic on 21 April 1996. The cloud consisted of thin cirriform layers, so that its motion was clearly observed. By means of time-lapse camera photography, the velocity of the cloud rotation was estimated to be around 2 m s−1. It is suggested that the existence of a high humidity layer at the bottom of an inversion layer is a key factor for the formation of the thin rotor cloud.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Hisashi Ozawa, Institute for Global Change Research, Frontier Research System for Earth Sciences, Shibaura 1-2-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0023, Japan.

Email: ozawa@frontier.esto.or.jp

Abstract

A thin rotor cloud was observed on the lee side of Penny Ice Cap in the Canadian Arctic on 21 April 1996. The cloud consisted of thin cirriform layers, so that its motion was clearly observed. By means of time-lapse camera photography, the velocity of the cloud rotation was estimated to be around 2 m s−1. It is suggested that the existence of a high humidity layer at the bottom of an inversion layer is a key factor for the formation of the thin rotor cloud.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Hisashi Ozawa, Institute for Global Change Research, Frontier Research System for Earth Sciences, Shibaura 1-2-1, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0023, Japan.

Email: ozawa@frontier.esto.or.jp

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