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Atlantic Tropical Systems of 1996 and 1997: Years of Contrasts

Lixion A. AvilaNOAA/NWS/Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida

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Richard J. PaschNOAA/NWS/Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida

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Jiann-Gwo JiingNOAA/NWS/Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center, Miami, Florida

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Abstract

A total of 62 and 63 tropical waves were counted in the Atlantic from May to November during 1996 and 1997, respectively. These waves led to the formation of 12 of the 13 total number of tropical cyclones in 1996 and only 3 of 7 tropical cyclones in 1997. All of the tropical depressions became tropical storms in 1996 and only one failed to become a named storm in 1997. On average, 62% of the Atlantic tropical depressions develop from tropical waves. These waves contributed to the formation of 92% of the eastern Pacific tropical cyclones in 1996 and 83% in 1997. Tropical waves and their environment during the 1996 and 1997 seasons are discussed.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Lixion A. Avila, Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center, 11691 SW 17th Street, Miami, FL 33165-2149.

Email: lixion@nhc.noaa.gov

Abstract

A total of 62 and 63 tropical waves were counted in the Atlantic from May to November during 1996 and 1997, respectively. These waves led to the formation of 12 of the 13 total number of tropical cyclones in 1996 and only 3 of 7 tropical cyclones in 1997. All of the tropical depressions became tropical storms in 1996 and only one failed to become a named storm in 1997. On average, 62% of the Atlantic tropical depressions develop from tropical waves. These waves contributed to the formation of 92% of the eastern Pacific tropical cyclones in 1996 and 83% in 1997. Tropical waves and their environment during the 1996 and 1997 seasons are discussed.

Corresponding author address: Dr. Lixion A. Avila, Tropical Prediction Center/National Hurricane Center, 11691 SW 17th Street, Miami, FL 33165-2149.

Email: lixion@nhc.noaa.gov

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