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Spectral (Bin) Microphysics Coupled with a Mesoscale Model (MM5). Part II: Simulation of a CaPE Rain Event with a Squall Line

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  • 1 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, Israel
  • | 2 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
  • | 3 The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, Israel
  • | 4 University of Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany
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Abstract

Spectral (bin) microphysics (SBM) has been implemented into the three-dimensional fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5). The new model was used to simulate a squall line that developed over Florida on 27 July 1991. It is shown that SBM reproduces precipitation rate, rain amounts, and location, radar reflectivity, and cloud structure much better than bulk parameterizations currently implemented in MM5.

Sensitivity tests show the importance of (i) raindrop breakup, (ii) in-cloud turbulence, (iii) different aerosol concentrations, and (iv) inclusion of scavenging of aerosols. Breakup decreases average and maximum rainfall. In-cloud turbulence enhances particle drop collision rates and increases rain rates. A “continental” aerosol concentration produces a much larger maximum rainfall rate versus that obtained with “maritime” aerosol concentration. At the same time accumulated rain is larger with maritime aerosol concentration. The scavenging of aerosols by nucleating water droplets strongly affected the concentration of aerosols in the atmosphere.

The spectral (bin) microphysics mesoscale model can potentially be used for studies of specific phenomena such as severe storms, winter storms, tropical cyclones, etc. The more realistic reproduction of cloud structure than that obtained with bulk parameterization implies that the model will be more useful for remote sensing applications and in the development of advanced rain retrieval algorithms. The model can also simulate the effect of cloud seeding on rain production.

Corresponding author address: Prof. Alexander P. Khain, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, Israel. Email: Khain@vms.huji.ac.il

Abstract

Spectral (bin) microphysics (SBM) has been implemented into the three-dimensional fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5). The new model was used to simulate a squall line that developed over Florida on 27 July 1991. It is shown that SBM reproduces precipitation rate, rain amounts, and location, radar reflectivity, and cloud structure much better than bulk parameterizations currently implemented in MM5.

Sensitivity tests show the importance of (i) raindrop breakup, (ii) in-cloud turbulence, (iii) different aerosol concentrations, and (iv) inclusion of scavenging of aerosols. Breakup decreases average and maximum rainfall. In-cloud turbulence enhances particle drop collision rates and increases rain rates. A “continental” aerosol concentration produces a much larger maximum rainfall rate versus that obtained with “maritime” aerosol concentration. At the same time accumulated rain is larger with maritime aerosol concentration. The scavenging of aerosols by nucleating water droplets strongly affected the concentration of aerosols in the atmosphere.

The spectral (bin) microphysics mesoscale model can potentially be used for studies of specific phenomena such as severe storms, winter storms, tropical cyclones, etc. The more realistic reproduction of cloud structure than that obtained with bulk parameterization implies that the model will be more useful for remote sensing applications and in the development of advanced rain retrieval algorithms. The model can also simulate the effect of cloud seeding on rain production.

Corresponding author address: Prof. Alexander P. Khain, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram, Jerusalem, Israel. Email: Khain@vms.huji.ac.il

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