Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 2004

Lixion A. Avila Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, Miami, Florida

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Richard J. Pasch Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, Miami, Florida

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John L. Beven II Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, Miami, Florida

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James L. Franklin Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, Miami, Florida

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Miles B. Lawrence Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, Miami, Florida

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Stacy R. Stewart Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, Miami, Florida

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Abstract

The 2004 eastern North Pacific hurricane season is reviewed. It was a below-average season in terms of number of systems and landfalls. There were 12 named tropical cyclones, of which 8 became hurricanes. None of the tropical storms or hurricanes made landfall, and there were no reports of deaths or damage. A description of each cyclone is provided, and track and intensity forecasts for the season are evaluated.

Corresponding author address: Lixion A. Avila, Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, 11691 SW 17th Street, Miami, FL 33165-2149. Email: Lixion.A.Avila@noaa.gov

Abstract

The 2004 eastern North Pacific hurricane season is reviewed. It was a below-average season in terms of number of systems and landfalls. There were 12 named tropical cyclones, of which 8 became hurricanes. None of the tropical storms or hurricanes made landfall, and there were no reports of deaths or damage. A description of each cyclone is provided, and track and intensity forecasts for the season are evaluated.

Corresponding author address: Lixion A. Avila, Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center, NOAA/NWS, 11691 SW 17th Street, Miami, FL 33165-2149. Email: Lixion.A.Avila@noaa.gov

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