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Structure and Evolution of a Possible U.S. Landfalling Tropical Storm in 2006

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  • 1 NOAA/Hurricane Research Division, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, and the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, Rosenstiel School for Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida
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Abstract

A tropical disturbance made landfall near Morehead City, North Carolina, on 27 June 2006. Surface observations, Air Force reconnaissance, and Doppler velocity data suggest that the disturbance had a closed surface circulation at landfall, with maximum 1-min surface winds >18 m s−1, the threshold of tropical storm strength. A cyclostrophic wind calculation using Doppler velocity data and surface observations indicates that the circulation of the disturbance likely caused the tropical storm force winds observed, rather than an environmental pressure gradient or short-lived convective process. Doppler velocity cross sections of the disturbance further suggest that the disturbance was warm core, and an analysis of the disturbance’s environment reveals that latent heat of condensation was likely a large source of energy for the disturbance, though there was some baroclinic forcing. These observations and analyses make a compelling case for the upgrade of the disturbance to a tropical storm in the best-track database.

Corresponding author address: Zachary Gruskin, 17350 SW 52 Ct., Southwest Ranches, FL 33331. Email: zachary.gruskin@noaa.gov

Abstract

A tropical disturbance made landfall near Morehead City, North Carolina, on 27 June 2006. Surface observations, Air Force reconnaissance, and Doppler velocity data suggest that the disturbance had a closed surface circulation at landfall, with maximum 1-min surface winds >18 m s−1, the threshold of tropical storm strength. A cyclostrophic wind calculation using Doppler velocity data and surface observations indicates that the circulation of the disturbance likely caused the tropical storm force winds observed, rather than an environmental pressure gradient or short-lived convective process. Doppler velocity cross sections of the disturbance further suggest that the disturbance was warm core, and an analysis of the disturbance’s environment reveals that latent heat of condensation was likely a large source of energy for the disturbance, though there was some baroclinic forcing. These observations and analyses make a compelling case for the upgrade of the disturbance to a tropical storm in the best-track database.

Corresponding author address: Zachary Gruskin, 17350 SW 52 Ct., Southwest Ranches, FL 33331. Email: zachary.gruskin@noaa.gov

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