Convection and Rapid Filamentation in Typhoon Sinlaku during TCS-08/T-PARC

Hung-Chi Kuo Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Taiwan University, and Taida Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan

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Chih-Pei Chang Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

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Ching-Hwang Liu Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan

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Abstract

This study examines the convection and rapid filamentation in Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) using the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) P-3 aircraft data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS-08) and The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) field experiments. The high-resolution aircraft radar and wind data are used to directly compute the filamentation time, to allow an investigation into the effect of filamentation on convection. During the reintensification stage, some regions of deep convection near the eyewall are found in the vorticity-dominated area where there is little filamentation. In some other parts of the eyewall and the outer spiral rainband region, including areas of upward motion, the filamentation process appears to suppress deep convection. However, the magnitude of the suppression differs greatly in the two regions. In the outer spiral band region, which is about 200 km from the center, the suppression is much more effective, such that the ratio of the deep convective regime occurrence over the stratiform regime varies from around 50% (200%) for filamentation time shorter (longer) than 24 min. In the eyewall cloud region where the conditions are conducive to deep convection, the filamentation effect may be quite limited. While effect of filamentation suppression is only about 10%, it is still systematic and conspicuous for filamentation times shorter than 19 min. The results suggest the possible importance of vortex-scale filamentation dynamics in suppressing deep convection and organizing spiral bands, which may affect the development and evolution of tropical cyclones.

Additional affiliation: Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.

Corresponding author address: Prof. Hung-Chi Kuo, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Taiwan University. No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan. E-mail: kuo@as.ntu.edu.tw

Abstract

This study examines the convection and rapid filamentation in Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) using the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) P-3 aircraft data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS-08) and The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment (THORPEX) Pacific Asian Regional Campaign (T-PARC) field experiments. The high-resolution aircraft radar and wind data are used to directly compute the filamentation time, to allow an investigation into the effect of filamentation on convection. During the reintensification stage, some regions of deep convection near the eyewall are found in the vorticity-dominated area where there is little filamentation. In some other parts of the eyewall and the outer spiral rainband region, including areas of upward motion, the filamentation process appears to suppress deep convection. However, the magnitude of the suppression differs greatly in the two regions. In the outer spiral band region, which is about 200 km from the center, the suppression is much more effective, such that the ratio of the deep convective regime occurrence over the stratiform regime varies from around 50% (200%) for filamentation time shorter (longer) than 24 min. In the eyewall cloud region where the conditions are conducive to deep convection, the filamentation effect may be quite limited. While effect of filamentation suppression is only about 10%, it is still systematic and conspicuous for filamentation times shorter than 19 min. The results suggest the possible importance of vortex-scale filamentation dynamics in suppressing deep convection and organizing spiral bands, which may affect the development and evolution of tropical cyclones.

Additional affiliation: Department of Meteorology, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.

Corresponding author address: Prof. Hung-Chi Kuo, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Taiwan University. No. 1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan. E-mail: kuo@as.ntu.edu.tw
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