APPLICATION OF A DIAGNOSTIC NUMERICAL MODEL TO THE TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

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  • 1 National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.
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Abstract

A diagnostic, nonlinear balanced model is applied in order to describe numerically the three dimensional structure of the tropical atmosphere. Several comparisons and experiments are made to gain insight into the physical processes and reliability of the model. These include different types of stream functions and temperature analyses, and the addition of surface friction and latent heat. A comparison between the kinematic vertical motion and the final numerical result is performed.

Obtained by using the complete form of the balance model, the derived vertical motion for August 12–14, 1961, in the Caribbean is presented in the form of cross sections. The vertical velocity fields, which are displayed in partitioned form, are compared with the analyzed moisture distribution. The validity of the computed vertical motion is discussed along with its possible influence on the tropical weather.

Past affiliation: University of California at Los Angeles.

Abstract

A diagnostic, nonlinear balanced model is applied in order to describe numerically the three dimensional structure of the tropical atmosphere. Several comparisons and experiments are made to gain insight into the physical processes and reliability of the model. These include different types of stream functions and temperature analyses, and the addition of surface friction and latent heat. A comparison between the kinematic vertical motion and the final numerical result is performed.

Obtained by using the complete form of the balance model, the derived vertical motion for August 12–14, 1961, in the Caribbean is presented in the form of cross sections. The vertical velocity fields, which are displayed in partitioned form, are compared with the analyzed moisture distribution. The validity of the computed vertical motion is discussed along with its possible influence on the tropical weather.

Past affiliation: University of California at Los Angeles.

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