EXPERIMENTS WITH A NUMERICAL MODEL OF TROPICAL CYCLONE DEVELOPMENT

Some Effects of Radial Resolution

STANLEY L. ROSENTHAL Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratories, National Hurricane Research Laboratory, ESSA, Miami, Fla.

Search for other papers by STANLEY L. ROSENTHAL in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Restricted access

Abstract

The model assumes the storm to be circularly symmetric and is expressed in z-coordinates. The information levels correspond to pressures in the mean tropical atmosphere of 1015, 900, 700, 500, 300, 200, and 100 mb. The heating function for the cyclone scale motion is simulated by a convective adjustment of the lapse rate towards a pseudoadiabat representative of ascent from the surface boundary layer. The rate of this adjustment is calibrated so that the vertically integrated heating function is related to the upward flux of water vapor through the surface boundary layer.

Experiments with 10- and 20-km radial resolution are compared. The 10-km calculation yields a storm with more realistic structure. The 20-km case does not contain a well-defined eye, whereas the 10-km experiment does. Rainfall, kinetic energy production, and efficiency are all larger with 20-km resolution. In both experiments, computational damping is an important component of the kinetic energy budget; however, the total dissipation of kinetic energy (computational plus explicit) is fairly reasonable in comparison to that found in empirical studies.

Abstract

The model assumes the storm to be circularly symmetric and is expressed in z-coordinates. The information levels correspond to pressures in the mean tropical atmosphere of 1015, 900, 700, 500, 300, 200, and 100 mb. The heating function for the cyclone scale motion is simulated by a convective adjustment of the lapse rate towards a pseudoadiabat representative of ascent from the surface boundary layer. The rate of this adjustment is calibrated so that the vertically integrated heating function is related to the upward flux of water vapor through the surface boundary layer.

Experiments with 10- and 20-km radial resolution are compared. The 10-km calculation yields a storm with more realistic structure. The 20-km case does not contain a well-defined eye, whereas the 10-km experiment does. Rainfall, kinetic energy production, and efficiency are all larger with 20-km resolution. In both experiments, computational damping is an important component of the kinetic energy budget; however, the total dissipation of kinetic energy (computational plus explicit) is fairly reasonable in comparison to that found in empirical studies.

Save