Convective-storm environments in subtropical South America from high-frequency soundings during RELAMPAGO-CACTI

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  • 1 Department 4 of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • 2 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois
  • 3 Center for Severe Weather Research, Boulder, Colorado
  • 4 Centro de Investigaciones del Mar y la Atmósfera (CIMA/CONICET-UBA), Instituto Franco-Argentino para el Estudio del Clima y sus Impactos (UMI IFAECI/CNRS-CONICET-UBA), Departamento de Ciencias de la Atmósfera y los Océanos, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • 5 Servicio Meteorológico Nacional, Argentina
  • 6 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington
  • 7 Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
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Abstract

During the RELAMPAGO-CACTI field experiments in 2018-19, an unprecedented number of balloon-borne soundings were collected in Argentina. Radiosondes were launched from both fixed and mobile platforms, yielding 2712 soundings during the period 15 October 2018-30 April 2019. Approximately 20% of these soundings were collected by highly mobile platforms, strategically positioned for each intensive observing period, and launching approximately once per hour. The combination of fixed and mobile soundings capture both the overall conditions characterizing the RELAMPAGO-CACTI campaign, as well as the detailed evolution of environments supporting the initiation and upscale growth of deep convective storms, including some that produced hazardous hail and heavy rainfall. Episodes of frequent convection were characterized by sufficient quantities of moisture and instability for deep convection, along with deep-layer vertical wind shear supportive of organized or rotating storms. Eleven soundings showed most-unstable convective available potential energy (MUCAPE) exceeding 6000 J kg−1, comparable to the extreme instability observed in other parts of the world with intense deep convection. Parameters used to diagnose severe-storm potential showed that conditions were often favorable for supercells and severe hail, but not for tornadoes, primarily owing to insufficient low-level wind shear. High-frequency soundings also revealed the structure and evolution of the boundary layer leading up to convection initiation, convectively generated cold pools, the South American Low-Level Jet (SALLJ), and elevated nocturnal convection. This sounding dataset will enable improved understanding and prediction of convective storms and their surroundings in subtropical South America, as well as comparisons with other heavily studied regions such as the central United States that have not previously been possible.

Corresponding author: Russ Schumacher, russ.schumacher@colostate.edu

Abstract

During the RELAMPAGO-CACTI field experiments in 2018-19, an unprecedented number of balloon-borne soundings were collected in Argentina. Radiosondes were launched from both fixed and mobile platforms, yielding 2712 soundings during the period 15 October 2018-30 April 2019. Approximately 20% of these soundings were collected by highly mobile platforms, strategically positioned for each intensive observing period, and launching approximately once per hour. The combination of fixed and mobile soundings capture both the overall conditions characterizing the RELAMPAGO-CACTI campaign, as well as the detailed evolution of environments supporting the initiation and upscale growth of deep convective storms, including some that produced hazardous hail and heavy rainfall. Episodes of frequent convection were characterized by sufficient quantities of moisture and instability for deep convection, along with deep-layer vertical wind shear supportive of organized or rotating storms. Eleven soundings showed most-unstable convective available potential energy (MUCAPE) exceeding 6000 J kg−1, comparable to the extreme instability observed in other parts of the world with intense deep convection. Parameters used to diagnose severe-storm potential showed that conditions were often favorable for supercells and severe hail, but not for tornadoes, primarily owing to insufficient low-level wind shear. High-frequency soundings also revealed the structure and evolution of the boundary layer leading up to convection initiation, convectively generated cold pools, the South American Low-Level Jet (SALLJ), and elevated nocturnal convection. This sounding dataset will enable improved understanding and prediction of convective storms and their surroundings in subtropical South America, as well as comparisons with other heavily studied regions such as the central United States that have not previously been possible.

Corresponding author: Russ Schumacher, russ.schumacher@colostate.edu
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