Vertical Structure of Time-Dependent Flow Dominated by Friction in a Well-Mixed Fluid

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  • 1 Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, Duluth 55812
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Abstract

Solutions of a linear hydrodynamic equation of motion with linear boundary conditions are obtained to describe the horizontal current, as a function of depth and time, determined by a given history of the wind force and pressure gradient up to that time, at a fixed point in the horizontal plane, in well-mixed water of finite depth. The bottom friction is assumed to be proportional to the bottom current, with zero bottom current and zero bottom friction considered as limiting cases. The general solution is established as an eigenfunction expansion when the eddy viscosity is given as a positive function of depth. Explicit formulas are worked out for viscosity functions that are constant, exponential, or varying as a power of the height from somewhere below the bottom or above the top of the water. For the latter the limit as the viscosity goes to zero at the bottom or top is considered. Numerical results are presented for viscosities that are constant, exponential, linear, or varying as the 3/4 power.

Abstract

Solutions of a linear hydrodynamic equation of motion with linear boundary conditions are obtained to describe the horizontal current, as a function of depth and time, determined by a given history of the wind force and pressure gradient up to that time, at a fixed point in the horizontal plane, in well-mixed water of finite depth. The bottom friction is assumed to be proportional to the bottom current, with zero bottom current and zero bottom friction considered as limiting cases. The general solution is established as an eigenfunction expansion when the eddy viscosity is given as a positive function of depth. Explicit formulas are worked out for viscosity functions that are constant, exponential, or varying as a power of the height from somewhere below the bottom or above the top of the water. For the latter the limit as the viscosity goes to zero at the bottom or top is considered. Numerical results are presented for viscosities that are constant, exponential, linear, or varying as the 3/4 power.

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