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EDITORIAL

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In January of 2001 the average production time—that is, the average time required for an accepted manuscript to appear in print after its receipt at American Meteorological Society (AMS) Headquarters—for AMS journals was over eight months. This was clearly unacceptable to authors, editors, and the Society as a whole. Production times had grown worse over a several-year period as the journals grew faster than the staffing at Headquarters did, and a serious backlog developed.

Strategic staffing increases, starting in 2000 but continuing through 2001, of technical and copy editors and editorial assistants, as well as a streamlining of the editing

In January of 2001 the average production time—that is, the average time required for an accepted manuscript to appear in print after its receipt at American Meteorological Society (AMS) Headquarters—for AMS journals was over eight months. This was clearly unacceptable to authors, editors, and the Society as a whole. Production times had grown worse over a several-year period as the journals grew faster than the staffing at Headquarters did, and a serious backlog developed.

Strategic staffing increases, starting in 2000 but continuing through 2001, of technical and copy editors and editorial assistants, as well as a streamlining of the editing

In January of 2001 the average production time—that is, the average time required for an accepted manuscript to appear in print after its receipt at American Meteorological Society (AMS) Headquarters—for AMS journals was over eight months. This was clearly unacceptable to authors, editors, and the Society as a whole. Production times had grown worse over a several-year period as the journals grew faster than the staffing at Headquarters did, and a serious backlog developed.

Strategic staffing increases, starting in 2000 but continuing through 2001, of technical and copy editors and editorial assistants, as well as a streamlining of the editing

In January of 2001 the average production time—that is, the average time required for an accepted manuscript to appear in print after its receipt at American Meteorological Society (AMS) Headquarters—for AMS journals was over eight months. This was clearly unacceptable to authors, editors, and the Society as a whole. Production times had grown worse over a several-year period as the journals grew faster than the staffing at Headquarters did, and a serious backlog developed.

Strategic staffing increases, starting in 2000 but continuing through 2001, of technical and copy editors and editorial assistants, as well as a streamlining of the editing

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