• Beal, L. M., and H. L. Bryden, 1999: The velocity and vorticity structure of the Agulhas Current at 32°S. J. Geophys. Res., 104, 51515176, https://doi.org/10.1029/1998JC900056.

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  • McMonigal, K., L. M. Beal, S. Elipot, K. L. Gunn, J. Hermes, T. Morris, and A. Houk, 2020: The impact of meanders, deepening and broadening, and seasonality on Agulhas Current temperature variability. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 50, 35293544, https://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-20-0018.1.

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    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Richardson, P. L., 2007: Agulhas leakage into the Atlantic estimated with subsurface floats and surface drifters. Deep-Sea Res. I, 54, 13611389, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2007.04.010.

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    • Search Google Scholar
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  • View in gallery

    Mean temperature (°C) and velocity (m s−1) structure of the Agulhas Current during (a) nonmeandering times and (b) meandering times. Colors and thin contours show temperature, with each contour corresponding to 1°C. Thick contours show cross-track velocity, with each contour corresponding to 0.25 m s−1. (c) Meander time series, as measured by sea level anomaly at 33.6°S, 28°E. Meanders are defined as times during which the SLA is lower than −0.2 m (gray shading).

  • View in gallery

    (a) Time series of the volume transport of the Agulhas Current. The boundary layer (“box”) transport is in black, and the streamwise (“jet”) transport is in red. Sizes of errors on each 20-h estimate are shown near the left axis. (b) Time series of the temperature transport. (c) Time series of the transport-weighted temperature, only shown when volume transport is larger than 25 Sv southward. Gray shadings in (a)–(c) show periods during which the current is meandering.

  • View in gallery

    (a) Composite temperature (colors) and velocity (thick contours) of the strongest 10% of southward box temperature transport times, excluding meander times. (b) Composite of the weakest 10% of southward box temperature transport times, excluding meander times. (c) The difference between the composites of strong minus weak temperature transport. (d) Time series of the box volume transport above 1000 m [Sv; blue (left axis)] and the square of the difference of depth between the 10°C isotherm at 20 km and at 219 km offshore [m2; red (right axis)].

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    Scatterplots of the (a) box and (b) jet temperature vs volume transport. Colors show the day of year of each data point. The black line shows a linear fit of the two variables.

  • View in gallery

    Scatterplots of the (a) box and (b) jet volume transport vs transport-weighted temperature. Colors show the day of year of each data point.

  • View in gallery

    The first three EOFs of the temperature field, labeled with the fraction of the total variance that each mode explains (fractional covariance; “fc”). The corresponding principal component time series are shown in Fig. 11, below. (a) The first EOF of the temperature field, describing 40% of the variance. (b) The second EOF of the temperature field, describing 25% of the variance. (c) The third EOF of the temperature field, describing 15% of the variance. (d) The pointwise correlation coefficient between principal component 2 and the cross-track velocity. Negative means that the pattern shown in EOF 2 is associated with negative anomalies of velocity (increased southward velocity). Correlations of less than 0.23 are not shown because they are not significant at the 95% confidence level according to the Pearson correlation using a decorrelation time scale of 10 days.

  • View in gallery

    The principal component time series of the first three EOFs, (a) principal component 1 (black; left axis) and the sea level anomaly near mooring C used to determine meander times (red; right axis), (b) principal component 2 (black; left axis) and the box temperature transport (red; right axis), and (c) principal component 3 (black) shown with 90-day smoothing (red) to highlight seasonal variability. Gray shadings in (a)–(c) show periods during which the current is meandering.

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    (a) Scatterplot of the spatial mean 0–1000-m velocity anomaly vs the spatial mean below-1000-m velocity anomaly. Nonmeander times are shown in black; meanders are shown in red. The black line shows a linear regression between the upper- and lower-layer velocity anomalies. (b) Scatterplot of the barotropic velocity against the upper-layer (red) and lower-layer (blue) velocity anomalies. The black line is a reference line with slope of 1.

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CORRIGENDUM

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  • 1 aRosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Miami, Miami, Florida
  • | 2 bNorth Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina
  • | 3 cCentre for Southern Hemisphere Oceans Research, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
  • | 4 dEgagasini Node, South African Environmental Observation Network, Cape Town, South Africa
  • | 5 eSouth African Weather Service, Cape Town, South Africa
Open access

© 2022 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: K. McMonigal, ktmcmoni@ncsu.edu

© 2022 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: K. McMonigal, ktmcmoni@ncsu.edu

After publication of McMonigal et al. (2020), an error in the rotation of the ADCP data at moorings C and D was identified. This coding error resulted in incorrect values for the reported time-mean volume and temperature transports. Importantly, the error had negligible impact on the variability of the velocity, volume transport, and temperature transport and thus does not affect the main conclusions of the paper. The majority of changes to the text are changes on the order of 0.01–0.1 to Pearson correlation coefficients.

Table C1, new to this corrigendum, shows all of the corrected values from the text. The corrected versions of Table 2 and Figs. 512 from McMonigal et al. (2020) are also provided here. The incorrect animation from the online supplemental material has been replaced with a corrected version and is available through the supplemental material link associated with the original paper (see the footnote and the reference for the applicable DOIs). The authors regret any inconvenience this error may have caused.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Mean temperature (°C) and velocity (m s−1) structure of the Agulhas Current during (a) nonmeandering times and (b) meandering times. Colors and thin contours show temperature, with each contour corresponding to 1°C. Thick contours show cross-track velocity, with each contour corresponding to 0.25 m s−1. (c) Meander time series, as measured by sea level anomaly at 33.6°S, 28°E. Meanders are defined as times during which the SLA is lower than −0.2 m (gray shading).

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

(a) Time series of the volume transport of the Agulhas Current. The boundary layer (“box”) transport is in black, and the streamwise (“jet”) transport is in red. Sizes of errors on each 20-h estimate are shown near the left axis. (b) Time series of the temperature transport. (c) Time series of the transport-weighted temperature, only shown when volume transport is larger than 25 Sv southward. Gray shadings in (a)–(c) show periods during which the current is meandering.

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

(a) Composite temperature (colors) and velocity (thick contours) of the strongest 10% of southward box temperature transport times, excluding meander times. (b) Composite of the weakest 10% of southward box temperature transport times, excluding meander times. (c) The difference between the composites of strong minus weak temperature transport. (d) Time series of the box volume transport above 1000 m [Sv; blue (left axis)] and the square of the difference of depth between the 10°C isotherm at 20 km and at 219 km offshore [m2; red (right axis)].

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

Scatterplots of the (a) box and (b) jet temperature vs volume transport. Colors show the day of year of each data point. The black line shows a linear fit of the two variables.

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Scatterplots of the (a) box and (b) jet volume transport vs transport-weighted temperature. Colors show the day of year of each data point.

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

The first three EOFs of the temperature field, labeled with the fraction of the total variance that each mode explains (fractional covariance; “fc”). The corresponding principal component time series are shown in Fig. 11, below. (a) The first EOF of the temperature field, describing 40% of the variance. (b) The second EOF of the temperature field, describing 25% of the variance. (c) The third EOF of the temperature field, describing 15% of the variance. (d) The pointwise correlation coefficient between principal component 2 and the cross-track velocity. Negative means that the pattern shown in EOF 2 is associated with negative anomalies of velocity (increased southward velocity). Correlations of less than 0.23 are not shown because they are not significant at the 95% confidence level according to the Pearson correlation using a decorrelation time scale of 10 days.

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 11.
Fig. 11.

The principal component time series of the first three EOFs, (a) principal component 1 (black; left axis) and the sea level anomaly near mooring C used to determine meander times (red; right axis), (b) principal component 2 (black; left axis) and the box temperature transport (red; right axis), and (c) principal component 3 (black) shown with 90-day smoothing (red) to highlight seasonal variability. Gray shadings in (a)–(c) show periods during which the current is meandering.

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Fig. 12.
Fig. 12.

(a) Scatterplot of the spatial mean 0–1000-m velocity anomaly vs the spatial mean below-1000-m velocity anomaly. Nonmeander times are shown in black; meanders are shown in red. The black line shows a linear regression between the upper- and lower-layer velocity anomalies. (b) Scatterplot of the barotropic velocity against the upper-layer (red) and lower-layer (blue) velocity anomalies. The black line is a reference line with slope of 1.

Citation: Journal of Physical Oceanography 52, 2; 10.1175/JPO-D-21-0175.1

Table C1

Corrected inline text values.

Table C1
Table 2

Statistics of the volume and temperature transport of the Agulhas Current.

Table 2

REFERENCES

  • Beal, L. M., and H. L. Bryden, 1999: The velocity and vorticity structure of the Agulhas Current at 32°S. J. Geophys. Res., 104, 51515176, https://doi.org/10.1029/1998JC900056.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McMonigal, K., L. M. Beal, S. Elipot, K. L. Gunn, J. Hermes, T. Morris, and A. Houk, 2020: The impact of meanders, deepening and broadening, and seasonality on Agulhas Current temperature variability. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 50, 35293544, https://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-20-0018.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Richardson, P. L., 2007: Agulhas leakage into the Atlantic estimated with subsurface floats and surface drifters. Deep-Sea Res. I, 54, 13611389, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2007.04.010.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

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