Near-surface Reflection and Nonlinear Effects of Low-mode Internal Tides on a Continental Slope

View More View Less
  • 1 State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, Hangzhou, China.
  • 2 School of Oceanography, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China
  • 3 Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory, Zhuhai, China
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

Two sets of mooring data were collected at two sites (MA and MB) along a cross-slope section on the northeastern continental slope in the South China Sea (SCS). These data are used to investigate evolution and energy decay of low-mode semidiurnal (M2) internal tides on a subcritical slope with respect to M2. At the deep portion of the slope (~1250 m; MA), the M2 internal tides show upward energy propagation, while vertically-standing M2 internal tides are often observed at shallow MB (~845 m). A two-dimensional linear internal tide model with realistic topography and stratification reproduces the observations, suggesting that low-mode M2 internal tides incident on subcritical slopes evolve into vertically-propagating internal waves due to topographic scattering, propagate upward to the boundary and reflect from the sea surface. The reflection point largely depends on the phase between the modal components of the incoming flux.

In the near-surface reflection region, two kinds of nonlinear effects are observed to decay energy of the incoming internal tides. One is the resonant parametric subharmonic instability which transfers M2 internal tides to diurnal subharmonics M1 (=M2/2), but the instability is found to mainly depend on the incident waves. The other one is the non-resonant wave-wave interaction, producing two higher-harmonic M4 (=2M2) rays with opposite vertical propagation. A strong westward mean flow is observed in the interacting region, with amplitude comparable to that of the incident waves. This mean flow also appears to be generated by the nonlinear reflection of the M2 internal tides.

Correspondence to: Xiaohui Xie, State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, Hangzhou, China. Email: xhxie2013@gmail.com

Abstract

Two sets of mooring data were collected at two sites (MA and MB) along a cross-slope section on the northeastern continental slope in the South China Sea (SCS). These data are used to investigate evolution and energy decay of low-mode semidiurnal (M2) internal tides on a subcritical slope with respect to M2. At the deep portion of the slope (~1250 m; MA), the M2 internal tides show upward energy propagation, while vertically-standing M2 internal tides are often observed at shallow MB (~845 m). A two-dimensional linear internal tide model with realistic topography and stratification reproduces the observations, suggesting that low-mode M2 internal tides incident on subcritical slopes evolve into vertically-propagating internal waves due to topographic scattering, propagate upward to the boundary and reflect from the sea surface. The reflection point largely depends on the phase between the modal components of the incoming flux.

In the near-surface reflection region, two kinds of nonlinear effects are observed to decay energy of the incoming internal tides. One is the resonant parametric subharmonic instability which transfers M2 internal tides to diurnal subharmonics M1 (=M2/2), but the instability is found to mainly depend on the incident waves. The other one is the non-resonant wave-wave interaction, producing two higher-harmonic M4 (=2M2) rays with opposite vertical propagation. A strong westward mean flow is observed in the interacting region, with amplitude comparable to that of the incident waves. This mean flow also appears to be generated by the nonlinear reflection of the M2 internal tides.

Correspondence to: Xiaohui Xie, State Key Laboratory of Satellite Ocean Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, Hangzhou, China. Email: xhxie2013@gmail.com
Save