• Adger, W. N., and Coauthors, 2009: Are there social limits to adaptation to climate change? Climatic Change, 93, 335354, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-008-9520-z.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Albright, K., P. Shah, M. Santodomingo, and J. Scandlyn, 2020: Dissemination of information about climate change by state and local public health departments: United States, 2019–2020. Amer. J. Public Health, 110, 11841190, https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305723.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Anderson, A., 2011: Sources, media, and modes of climate change communication: The role of celebrities. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev.: Climate Change, 2, 535546, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.119.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Anup, K. C., 2018: Climate change communication in Nepal. Practice of Climate Change Communication, W. Leal Filho et al., Eds., Vol. 2, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 21–35.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Ballantyne, A. G., 2016: Climate change communication: What can we learn from communication theory? Wiley Interdiscip. Rev.: Climate Change, 7, 329344, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.392.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bateson, M. C., 2007: Education for global responsibility. Creating a Climate for Change: Communicating Climate Change and Facilitating Social Change, S. C. Moser and L. Dilling, Eds., Cambridge University Press, 281–291.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Bingham, S., 2007: Climate change: A moral issue. Communicating Climate Change and Facilitating Social Change, S. Moser and L. Dilling, Eds., Cambridge University Press, 153–166.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Braun, V., and V. Clarke, 2006: Using thematic analysis in psychology. Qual. Res. Psychol., 3, 77101, https://doi.org/10.1191/1478088706qp063oa.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brechin, S. R., and M. Bhandari, 2011: Perceptions of climate change worldwide. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev.: Climate Change, 2, 871885, https://doi.org/10.1002/WCC.146.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bulkeley, H., and P. Newell, 2010: Governing Climate Change. Routledge, 180 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • CCC, 2016: UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017 synthesis report: Priorities for the next five years. Committee on Climate Change Rep., 86 pp., https://www.theccc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/UK-CCRA-2017-Synthesis-Report-Committee-on-Climate-Change.pdf.

  • Chapman, D. A., A. Corner, R. Webster, and E. M. Markowitz, 2016: Climate visuals: A mixed methods investigation of public perceptions of climate images in three countries. Global Environ. Change, 41, 172182, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2016.10.003.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Corner, A., C. Shaw, and J. Clarke, 2018: Principles for effective communication and public engagement on climate change: A handbook for IPCC authors. Climate Outreach Doc., 28 pp., https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/2017/08/Climate-Outreach-IPCC-communications-handbook.pdf.

  • Cortese, M., 2018: Reconsidering fictional films for communicating climate change issues: An analysis of the filmmaking strategies behind sustainable energy narratives. Theory of Climate Change Communication, W. Leal Filho et al., Eds., Vol. 1, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 123–136.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Defra, 2018: The National Adaptation Programme and the Third Strategy for Climate Adaptation Reporting: Making the country resilient to a changing climate. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Rep., 128 pp., https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727252/national-adaptation-programme-2018.pdf.

  • Department for Education, 2014: National curriculum. DfE, accessed 2 May 2020, https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/national-curriculum.

  • EDB, 2017a: General studies curriculum guide for primary schools (primary 1–primary 6). Curriculum Development Council Doc., 226 pp., https://www.edb.gov.hk/attachment/en/curriculum-development/renewal/GS/GS_KLACG_P1-6_Eng_2017.pdf.

  • EDB, 2017b: Science education: Key learning area curriculum guide (primary 1–secondary 6). Curriculum Development Council Doc., 188 pp., https://www.edb.gov.hk/attachment/en/curriculum-development/renewal/SE/SE_KLACG_P1-S6_Eng_2017.pdf.

  • Education Scotland, 2019: Climate change and education in Scotland. Education Scotland Doc., 8 pp., https://education.gov.scot/improvement/Documents/ClimateChangeinScottishEducationBriefing140819new.pdf.

  • ENB, 2015: Hong Kong Climate Change Report 2015. ENB Doc., 122 pp., https://www.enb.gov.hk/sites/default/files/pdf/ClimateChangeEng.pdf.

  • ENB, 2017: Hong Kong Climate Action Plan 2030+. ENB Doc., 102 pp., https://www.climateready.gov.hk/files/report/en/Hong Kong_Climate_Action_Plan_2030+_booklet_En.pdf.

  • Ferranti, E. J. S., A. R. MacKenzie, J. G. Levine, K. Ashworth, and C. N. Hewitt, 2019: First steps in air quality for built environment practitioners. University of Birmingham & TDAG Tech. Rep., 4 pp., http://epapers.bham.ac.uk/3069/.

  • Flick, U., 2014: An Introduction to Qualitative Research. Sage, 696 pp.

  • Green, R., 2018: How aesthetic style can influence reception of visual communications of climate change. Theory of Climate Change Communication, L. W. Filho et al., Eds., Vol. 1, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 77–93.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • HKO, 2015: Hong Kong in a warming world. Hong Kong Observatory Doc., 17 pp., https://www.hko.gov.hk/climate_change/climate_change_e.pdf.

  • HKO, 2019: Climate change. Hong Kong Observatory, accessed 24 April 2019, https://www.hko.gov.hk/en/climate_change/climate_change.htm.

  • Hulme, M., 2015: (Still) disagreeing about climate change: Which way forward? J. Religion Sci., 50, 893905, https://doi.org/10.1111/zygo.12212.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IPCC, 2018: Summary for policymakers. Global Warming of 1.5°C, WMO, 32 pp., https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/sites/2/2019/05/SR15_SPM_version_report_LR.pdf.

  • Kendon, M., M. McCarthy, S. Jevrejeva, A. Matthews, and T. Legg, 2019: State of the UK climate 2018. Int. J. Climatol., 39, 155, https://doi.org/10.1002/joc.6213.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Korte, A., 2016: AAAS Pacific Division explores climate-change communication. Science, 353, 455456, https://doi.org/10.1126/science.353.6298.455.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Leal Filho, W., E. Manolas, A. M. Azul, U. M. Azeiteiro, and H. McGhie, Eds., 2018: Theory of Climate Change Communication. Vol. 1, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 397 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Leal Filho, W., E. Manolas, A. M. Azul, U. M. Azeiteiro, and H. McGhie, Eds., 2018b: Practice of Climate Change Communication. Vol. 2, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 419 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Leal Filho, W., E. Manolas, A. M. Azul, U. M. Azeiteiro, and H. McGhie, Eds., 2018c: Case Studies in Climate Change Communication. Vol. 3, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 398 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Ledger, A., 2018: Essais. Theatre Dance Perform. Train., 9, 282286, https://doi.org/10.1080/19443927.2018.1475161.

  • Lee, T. M., E. M. Markowitz, P. D. Howe, C. Y. Ko, and A. A. Leiserowitz, 2015: Predictors of public climate change awareness and risk perception around the world. Nat. Climate Change, 5, 10141020, https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2728.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Levine, A. S., and R. Kline, 2017: A new approach for evaluating climate change communication. Climatic Change, 142, 301309, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-017-1952-x.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Luqiu, L. R., 2017: The elephant in the room: Media ownership and political participation in Hong Kong. Chin. J. Commun., 10, 360376, https://doi.org/10.1080/17544750.2017.1371783.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Markowitz, E. M., and M. L. Guckian, 2018: Climate change communication: Challenges, insights, and opportunities. Psychology and Climate Change, S. Clayton and C. Manning, Eds., Elsevier, 35–63.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Mayer, B., 2017: Climate change mitigation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Climate Law, 7, 6596, https://doi.org/10.1163/18786561-00702001.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • McLoughlin, N., A. Corner, S. Capstick, H. Richardson, A. Bell, C. Muller, and S. Illingworth, 2018: Climate communication in practice: How are we engaging the UK public on climate change? Climate Outreach Doc., 32 pp., https://theclimatecommsproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Climate-communication-in-practice.pdf.

  • Merriam, S. B., and E. J. Tisdell, 2015: Qualitative Research: A Guide to Design and Implementation. John Wiley and Sons, 368 pp.

  • Morris, B. S., P. Chrysochou, J. D. Christensen, J. L. Orquin, J. Barraza, P. J. Zak, and P. Mitkidis, 2019: Stories vs. facts: Triggering emotion and action-taking on climate change. Climatic Change, 154, 1937, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-019-02425-6.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Moser, S. C., 2010: Communicating climate change: History, challenges, process and future directions. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev.: Climate Change, 1, 3153, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.11.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Moser, S. C., 2016: Reflections on climate change communication research and practice in the second decade of the 21st century: What more is there to say? Wiley Interdiscip. Rev.: Climate Change, 7, 345369, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.403.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Moser, S. C., and L. Dilling, 2007: Toward the social tipping point: Creating a climate for change. Communicating Climate Change and Facilitating Social Change, S. Moser and L. Dilling, Eds., Cambridge, 516 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Nachmany, M., and J. Setzer, 2018: Global trends in climate change legislation and litigation: 2018 snapshot. Grantham Research Center on Climate Change and the Environment and Center for Climate Change Economics and Policy Doc., 8 pp., https://www.lse.ac.uk/GranthamInstitute/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Global-trends-in-climate-change-legislation-and-litigation-2018-snapshot-3.pdf.

  • Naustdalslid, J., 2011: Climate change—The challenge of translating scientific knowledge into action. Int. J. Sustainable Dev. World Ecol., 18, 243252, https://doi.org/10.1080/13504509.2011.572303.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ng, M. K., 2012: A critical review of Hong Kong’s proposed climate change strategy and action agenda. Cities, 29, 8898, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2011.08.001.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Noble, H., and J. Smith, 2015: Issues of validity and reliability in qualitative research. Evid. Based Nurs., 18, 3435, https://doi.org/10.1136/eb-2015-102054.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nursey-Bray, M., and Coauthors, 2012: Communicating climate change: Climate change risk perceptions and rock lobster fishers, Tasmania. Mar. Policy, 36, 753759, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpol.2011.10.015.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nursey-Bray, M., R. Palmer, T. F. Smith, and P. Rist, 2019: Old ways for new days: Australian indigenous peoples and climate change. Local Environ., 24, 473486, https://doi.org/10.1080/13549839.2019.1590325.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • O’Neill, S. J. and N. Smith, 2014: Climate change and visual imagery, Wiley Interdiscip. Rev. Climate Change, 5, 7387, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.249.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ojala, M., 2012: Hope and climate change: The importance of hope for environmental engagement among young people. Environ. Educ. Res., 18, 625642, https://doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2011.637157.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pearson, A. R., M. T. Ballew, S. Naiman, and J. P. Schuldt, 2017: Race, class, gender and climate change communication. Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Climate Science, Oxford University Press, https://doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228620.013.412.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Ponce de Leon, I. P., and C. K. Gotangco, 2018: Balancing paradigms in climate change communication research to support climate services. Theory of Climate Change Communication, L. W. Filho et al., Eds., Vol. 1, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 187–199.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Porter, J. J., D. Demeritt, and S. Dessai, 2015: The right stuff? Informing adaptation to climate change in British local government. Global Environ. Change, 35, 411422, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2015.10.004.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pugliese, A., and J. Ray, 2009: Top-emitting countries differ on climate change threat. Gallup, accessed 22 April 2020, https://news.gallup.com/poll/124595/Top-Emitting-Countries-Differ-Climate-Change-Threat.aspx#2.

  • Richards, G. W., and R. C. Den Hoed, 2018. Seven strategies of climate change science communication for policy change: Combining academic theory with practical evidence from science–policy partnerships in Canada. Theory of Climate Change Communication, L. W. Filho et al., Eds., Vol. 1, Handbook of Climate Change Communication, Springer, 147–160.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Ritchie, H., 2018: Who emits more than their share of CO2 emissions? Our World in Data, University of Oxford Oxford Martin Programme on Global Development, accessed 22 April 2020, https://ourworldindata.org/share-co2-emissions.

  • Rudiak-Gould, P., 2012: Promiscuous corroboration and climate change translation: A case study from the Marshall Islands. Global Environ. Change, 22, 4654, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2011.09.011.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rühlemann, A., and J. C. Jordan, 2021: Risk perception and culture: Implications for vulnerability and adaptation to climate change. Disasters, https://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12429, in press.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Sanina, A., A. Balashov, M. Rubtcova, and D. M. Satinsky, 2017: The effectiveness of communication channels in government and business communication. Inf. Polity: Int. J. Gov. Democracy Inf. Age, 22, 251267, https://doi.org/10.3233/IP-170415.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Schweizer, S., J. L. Thompson, T. Teel, and B. Bruyere, 2009: Strategies for communicating about climate change impacts on public lands. Sci. Commun., 31, 266274, https://doi.org/10.1177/1075547009352971.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SDC, 2019: Long-Term Decarbonisation Strategy: Public engagement. Council for Sustainable Development Doc., 56 pp., https://www.susdev.org.hk/download/pe_document_e.pdf.

  • Spencer, S., 2011: Visual Research Methods in the Social Sciences: Awakening Visions. Routledge, 296 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Wang, B., and Q. Zhou, 2020: Climate change in the Chinese mind: An overview of public perceptions at macro and micro levels. Wiley Interdiscip. Rev.: Climate Change, 11, e639, https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.639.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Welford, R., 2008: Climate change challenges for Hong Kong: An agenda for adaptation. CSR Asia and Hong Kong University Doc., 14 pp., https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/24460873/climate-change-challenges-for-hong-kong-an-agenda-csr-asia.

  • Wibeck, V., 2014: Enhancing learning, communication and public engagement about climate change—Some lessons from recent literature. Environ. Educ. Res., 20, 387411, https://doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2013.812720.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • World Population Review, 2020: High income countries. Accessed 22 April 2020, http://worldpopulationreview.com/countries/high-income-countries/.

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 211 211 211
Full Text Views 7 7 7
PDF Downloads 9 9 9

A Comparison of Government Communication of Climate Change in Hong Kong and United Kingdom

View More View Less
  • 1 School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Science, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom
  • 2 School of Life Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

As leaders of civil society, governments have a prime responsibility to communicate climate change information in order to motivate their citizens to mitigate and adapt. This study compares the approaches of the U.K. and Hong Kong governments. Although different in size and population, the United Kingdom and Hong Kong have similar climate change agendas to communicate to similarly educated and prosperous populations. The study finds that while both governments use similar means: policy, education, campaigns, internet, and social media, these have different characteristics, with different emphases in their climate change message. The United Kingdom’s top-down approach is more prominent in its legally binding policy and well-defined programs for adaptation and risk assessment. Hong Kong has more effectively embedded climate change education across the school curricula and has a more centralized and consistently branded campaign, with widespread use of visual language to connect the public to the problem. Hong Kong frames climate change as a science–society problem and has a greater focus on self-responsibility and bottom-up behavioral change. Thus, the U.K. and Hong Kong governments have polarized approaches to motivating their citizens into climate action. Moving forward, both governments should consider best practice elements of the other to develop their communication of climate change.

Significance Statement

Governments have a key responsibility to communicate information about climate change in order to raise public awareness about the risks of climate change and also to motivate actions and change beliefs. This article compares the different approaches of the U.K. and Hong Kong governments in terms of policy, reports, education, campaigns, and social media. It finds that the United Kingdom has prominent adaptation and risk assessment programs mandated by policy, whereas Hong Kong has more effectively embedded climate change education in the school curricula and has a more centralized and consistently branded campaign with increased focus on self-responsibility and behavioral change. Both governments must evaluate their communication approaches to show effective leadership and response to the “climate emergency.”

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Emma Ferranti, e.ferranti@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

As leaders of civil society, governments have a prime responsibility to communicate climate change information in order to motivate their citizens to mitigate and adapt. This study compares the approaches of the U.K. and Hong Kong governments. Although different in size and population, the United Kingdom and Hong Kong have similar climate change agendas to communicate to similarly educated and prosperous populations. The study finds that while both governments use similar means: policy, education, campaigns, internet, and social media, these have different characteristics, with different emphases in their climate change message. The United Kingdom’s top-down approach is more prominent in its legally binding policy and well-defined programs for adaptation and risk assessment. Hong Kong has more effectively embedded climate change education across the school curricula and has a more centralized and consistently branded campaign, with widespread use of visual language to connect the public to the problem. Hong Kong frames climate change as a science–society problem and has a greater focus on self-responsibility and bottom-up behavioral change. Thus, the U.K. and Hong Kong governments have polarized approaches to motivating their citizens into climate action. Moving forward, both governments should consider best practice elements of the other to develop their communication of climate change.

Significance Statement

Governments have a key responsibility to communicate information about climate change in order to raise public awareness about the risks of climate change and also to motivate actions and change beliefs. This article compares the different approaches of the U.K. and Hong Kong governments in terms of policy, reports, education, campaigns, and social media. It finds that the United Kingdom has prominent adaptation and risk assessment programs mandated by policy, whereas Hong Kong has more effectively embedded climate change education in the school curricula and has a more centralized and consistently branded campaign with increased focus on self-responsibility and behavioral change. Both governments must evaluate their communication approaches to show effective leadership and response to the “climate emergency.”

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Emma Ferranti, e.ferranti@bham.ac.uk
Save