Role of Agrometeorological Advisory Services in Enhancing Food Security and Reducing Vulnerability to Climate Change

Rakesh Gomaji Nannewar aEnergy, Environment and Climate Change Programme, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru, India
bManipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India

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Tejal Kanitkar aEnergy, Environment and Climate Change Programme, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru, India

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R. Srikanth aEnergy, Environment and Climate Change Programme, National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bengaluru, India

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Abstract

Providing knowledge inputs to farmers is critical to reduce their vulnerability and enhance resilience against climate change. In developing countries such as India, where small holdings and rain-fed agriculture are predominant, knowledge inputs become even more critical. The India Meteorological Department has provided integrated agrometeorological advisory services (AAS) to farmers since 2008. In this paper, we estimate the scale of access to AAS and its impact on crop yields in 1000 households across 10 villages in two agroclimatic zones in India. We find evidence suggesting that access to AAS can have a significant impact on crop yields in the kharif (June–September) season, whereas other inputs are more important in the case of rabi (winter) crops. Specifically, the yields of pigeon pea, soybean, and pearl millet are higher by 233, 98, and 318 kg ha−1, respectively, for AAS beneficiaries. For the entire study area, this translates to a value addition of $9.66 million for these three crops in one season. Our results show that AAS can be an important contributor to meeting the developmental goals of enhancing food security in dry-land agriculture and building resilience against climate change.

Significance Statement

In the era of climate change, with rapidly increasing weather and climatic variability, protecting the incomes of small farmers and ensuring they have the capacity to adapt and build resilience to the growing impacts of climate change is an urgent necessity. We have studied the impact of knowledge services such as the agrometeorological advisory services of the India Meteorological Department on crop yields for major crops in dry agroclimatic zones in India. The study shows that large public programs like the agrometeorological advisory services that bring science to people in meaningful ways can contribute significantly to meeting developmental goals and building resilience against climate change.

© 2023 American Meteorological Society. This published article is licensed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

This article is included in the Peter J. Lamb Special Collection: Climate Variability and Its Impacts Special Collection.

Corresponding author: Rakesh Gomaji Nannewar, rakeshn@nias.res.in

Abstract

Providing knowledge inputs to farmers is critical to reduce their vulnerability and enhance resilience against climate change. In developing countries such as India, where small holdings and rain-fed agriculture are predominant, knowledge inputs become even more critical. The India Meteorological Department has provided integrated agrometeorological advisory services (AAS) to farmers since 2008. In this paper, we estimate the scale of access to AAS and its impact on crop yields in 1000 households across 10 villages in two agroclimatic zones in India. We find evidence suggesting that access to AAS can have a significant impact on crop yields in the kharif (June–September) season, whereas other inputs are more important in the case of rabi (winter) crops. Specifically, the yields of pigeon pea, soybean, and pearl millet are higher by 233, 98, and 318 kg ha−1, respectively, for AAS beneficiaries. For the entire study area, this translates to a value addition of $9.66 million for these three crops in one season. Our results show that AAS can be an important contributor to meeting the developmental goals of enhancing food security in dry-land agriculture and building resilience against climate change.

Significance Statement

In the era of climate change, with rapidly increasing weather and climatic variability, protecting the incomes of small farmers and ensuring they have the capacity to adapt and build resilience to the growing impacts of climate change is an urgent necessity. We have studied the impact of knowledge services such as the agrometeorological advisory services of the India Meteorological Department on crop yields for major crops in dry agroclimatic zones in India. The study shows that large public programs like the agrometeorological advisory services that bring science to people in meaningful ways can contribute significantly to meeting developmental goals and building resilience against climate change.

© 2023 American Meteorological Society. This published article is licensed under the terms of the default AMS reuse license. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

This article is included in the Peter J. Lamb Special Collection: Climate Variability and Its Impacts Special Collection.

Corresponding author: Rakesh Gomaji Nannewar, rakeshn@nias.res.in
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