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Harvesting Experience for Adapting to Climate Change

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  • 1 University of Colorado, Boulder
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In June 2002, at the opening of the 27th annual Natural Hazard Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, several hundred participants were asked to stand up one by one, and, in 10 seconds each, introduce themselves and explain why they were there. Gilbert White, the leading pioneer in natural hazards research, explained that he was looking for answers to a question: “Why, despite all the research on hazard mitigation over three decades, do losses from hazards continue to go up?”

White’s question implies that explaining the problem of increasing losses is not enough. As researchers, we share some portion of responsibility for

In June 2002, at the opening of the 27th annual Natural Hazard Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, several hundred participants were asked to stand up one by one, and, in 10 seconds each, introduce themselves and explain why they were there. Gilbert White, the leading pioneer in natural hazards research, explained that he was looking for answers to a question: “Why, despite all the research on hazard mitigation over three decades, do losses from hazards continue to go up?”

White’s question implies that explaining the problem of increasing losses is not enough. As researchers, we share some portion of responsibility for

In June 2002, at the opening of the 27th annual Natural Hazard Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, several hundred participants were asked to stand up one by one, and, in 10 seconds each, introduce themselves and explain why they were there. Gilbert White, the leading pioneer in natural hazards research, explained that he was looking for answers to a question: “Why, despite all the research on hazard mitigation over three decades, do losses from hazards continue to go up?”

White’s question implies that explaining the problem of increasing losses is not enough. As researchers, we share some portion of responsibility for

In June 2002, at the opening of the 27th annual Natural Hazard Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, several hundred participants were asked to stand up one by one, and, in 10 seconds each, introduce themselves and explain why they were there. Gilbert White, the leading pioneer in natural hazards research, explained that he was looking for answers to a question: “Why, despite all the research on hazard mitigation over three decades, do losses from hazards continue to go up?”

White’s question implies that explaining the problem of increasing losses is not enough. As researchers, we share some portion of responsibility for

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