• Ashley, W. S., 2007: Spatial and temporal analysis of tornado fatalities in the United States: 1880–2005. Wea. Forecasting, 22, 12141228, doi:10.1175/2007WAF2007004.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Barbieri, C., S. Wilhelm Stanis, S. Xu, and J. Chen, 2010: 2009 recreational storm chaser study report. Dept. of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, University of Missouri, 28 pp.

  • Beaud, J.-P., 2009: L’échantillonnage. Recherche sociale: De la problématique à la collecte des données, B. Gauthier, Ed., Presses de l’Université du Québec, 251–284.

  • Bell, C., and J. Lyall, 2002: The accelerated sublime: Thrill-seeking adventure heroes in the commodified landscape. Tourism: Between Place and Performance, S. Coleman and M. Crang, Eds., Berghahn Books, 21–37.

  • Bernard, R., 2011: Research Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Altamira Press, 680 pp.

  • Bristow, R. S., and H. Cantillon, 2000: Tornado chasing: The ultimate risk tourism. Parks Recreat., 35, 98106.

  • Brooks, H. E., and C. A. Doswell, 2001: Normalized damage from major tornadoes in the United States: 1890–1999. Wea. Forecasting, 16, 168176, doi:10.1175/1520-0434(2001)016<0168:NDFMTI>2.0.CO;2.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Brooks, H. E., C. A. Doswell, and M. P. Kay, 2003: Climatological estimates of local daily tornado probability for the United States. Wea. Forecasting, 18, 626640, doi:10.1175/1520-0434(2003)018<0626:CEOLDT>2.0.CO;2.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Cantillon, H., and R. S. Bristow, 2001: Tornado chasing: An introduction to risk tourism opportunities. Proceedings of the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium, G. Kyle, Ed., U.S. Department of Agriculture General Tech. Rep. NE-276, 234–239.

  • Castree, N., 2008a: Neoliberasing nature: The logics of deregulation and reregulation. Environ. Plann., 40A, 131152, doi:10.1068/a3999.

  • Castree, N., 2008b: Neoliberasing nature: Processes, effects, and evaluations. Environ. Plann., 40A, 153172, doi:10.1068/a39100.

  • Castree, N., and B. Braun, Eds., 2001: Social Nature: Theory, Practice and Politics. Blackwell, 249 pp.

  • Cater, C. I., 2006: Playing with risk? Participant perceptions of risk and management complications in adventure tourism. Tourism Manage., 27, 317325, doi:10.1016/j.tourman.2004.10.005.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chen, J., S. Wilhelm Stanis, C. Barbieri, and S. Xu, 2012: An application of Importance-Performance Analysis to recreational storm chasing. Proceedings of the 2010 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium, C. LeBlanc Fisher and C. E. Watts Jr., Eds., U.S. Department of Agriculture General Tech. Rep. NRS-P-94, 45–51.

  • Cronon, W., 1996a: The trouble with wilderness; or, getting back to the wrong nature. Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature, W. Cronon, Ed., W. W. Norton & Company, 69–90.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • Cronon, W., Ed., 1996b: Uncommon Ground: Rethinking the Human Place in Nature. W. W. Norton & Company, 561 pp.

  • Descola, P., 1996: Constructing natures: Symbolic ecology and social practice. Nature and Society: Anthropological Perspectives, P. Descola, and G. Pálsson, Eds., Routledge, 82–102.

  • Descola, P., and G. Pálsson, Eds., 1996: Nature and Society: Anthropological Perspectives. Routledge, 310 pp.

  • Drost, R., 2013: Memory and decision making: Determining action when the sirens sound. Wea. Climate Soc., 5, 4354, doi:10.1175/WCAS-D-11-00042.1.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Duffy, R., 2008: Neoliberalising nature: Global networks and ecotourism development in Madagascar. J. Sustain. Tour., 16, 327344, doi:10.1080/09669580802154124.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ellen, R., and K. Fukui, Eds., 1996: Redefining Nature: Ecology, Culture and Domestication. Explorations in Anthropology, Berg, 664 pp.

  • Fortin, F., 2010: Fondements et étapes du processus de recherche: Méthodes quantitatives et qualitatives. Chenelière Éducation, 632 pp.

  • Frank, D. J., 1997: Science, nature, and the globalization of the environment, 1870–1990. Soc. Forces, 76, 409435, doi:10.2307/2580719.

  • Fritsch, A., and K. Johannsen, 2003: Ecotourism in Appalachia: Marketing the Mountains. University Press of Kentucky, 296 pp.

  • Hannigan, J., 2014: Environmental Sociology. Routledge, 258 pp.

    • Crossref
    • Export Citation
  • King, D. A., and W. P. Stewart, 1996: Ecotourism and commodification: Protecting people and places. Biodiversity Conserv., 5, 293305, doi:10.1007/BF00051775.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Laperrière, A., 1997: La théorisation ancrée (grounded theory): Démarche analytique et comparaison avec d’autres approches apparentées. La recherche qualitative: Enjeux épistémologiques et méthodologiques, J. Poupart et al., Eds., Gaëtan Morin, 309–340.

  • Lewis, J., 2003: Design issues. Qualitative Research Practice: A Guide for Social Science Students and Researchers, J. Ritchie and J. Lewis, Eds., Sage Publications, 47–76.

  • Moran, E. F., 2006: People and Nature: An Introduction to Human Ecological Relations. Blackwell, 218 pp.

  • NOAA, 2016: State of the climate: Tornadoes for annual 2015. National Centers for Environmental Information, accessed 12 January 2016. [Available online at http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/tornadoes/201513.]

  • Pálsson, G., 1996: Human-environmental relations: Orientalism, paternalism, communalism. Nature and Society: Anthropological Perspectives, P. Descola and G. Pálsson, Eds., Routledge, 63–81.

  • Robertson, D., 1999: Beyond twister: A geography of recreational storm chasing on the Southern Plains. Geogr. Rev., 89, 533553, doi:10.2307/216101.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Wihelm Stanis, S., and C. Barbieri, 2012: Niche tourism attributes scale: A case of storm chasing. Curr. Issues Tourism, 16, 495500, doi:10.1080/13683500.2012.733360.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Walle, A. H., 1997: Pursuing risk or insight: Marketing adventures. Ann. Tourism Res., 24, 265282, doi:10.1016/S0160-7383(97)80001-1.

  • Weber, K., 2001: Outdoor adventure tourism: A review of research approaches. Ann. Tourism Res., 28, 360377, doi:10.1016/S0160-7383(00)00051-7.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Xu, S., C. Barbieri, S. Wilhelm Stanis, and P. S. Market, 2012: Sensation-seeking attributes associated with storm-chasing tourists: Implications for future engagement. Int. J. Tourism Res., 14, 269284, doi:10.1002/jtr.860.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 7 7 7
PDF Downloads 3 3 3

When Severe Weather Becomes a Tourist Attraction: Understanding the Relationship with Nature in Storm-Chasing Tourism

View More View Less
  • 1 Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada
Restricted access

Abstract

Since the mid-1990s, tourists can purchase storm-chasing tours to observe dangerous, potentially deadly natural phenomena—that companies cannot guarantee will occur. This context calls for a better understanding of the core aspect of the relationship between storm-chasing tourism and severe weather. What interest in severe weather spurs people to embark on storm-chasing tourism? How do they deal with severe weather becoming a tourist attraction through storm-chasing tourism? The present exploratory study investigates these questions using a qualitative methodology. It first examines the ways severe weather is depicted in participants’ discourse and on storm-chasing companies’ websites, illustrating they are multiple and intersecting. It then describes the various rationales used by tourists, guides, and owners when they discuss storm-chasing tourism turning severe weather into a tourist attraction, showing how the activity contributes to nature’s commodification process. Seeking to provide an initial anthropological interpretation of the findings, this study suggests that storm-chasing tourism brings together acceptance and exploitation of nature. Indeed, severe weather appears to be sought for its power over humans while also being marketed as an ordinary commodity. Albeit preliminary, this study sheds light on a fundamental feature of storm-chasing tourism that researchers have not yet fully addressed and enhances the comprehension of a piece of humankind’s relationship with nature in current Western societies.

© 2017 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author e-mail: Catherine Morin Boulais, catherine.morin-boulais.1@ulaval.ca

Abstract

Since the mid-1990s, tourists can purchase storm-chasing tours to observe dangerous, potentially deadly natural phenomena—that companies cannot guarantee will occur. This context calls for a better understanding of the core aspect of the relationship between storm-chasing tourism and severe weather. What interest in severe weather spurs people to embark on storm-chasing tourism? How do they deal with severe weather becoming a tourist attraction through storm-chasing tourism? The present exploratory study investigates these questions using a qualitative methodology. It first examines the ways severe weather is depicted in participants’ discourse and on storm-chasing companies’ websites, illustrating they are multiple and intersecting. It then describes the various rationales used by tourists, guides, and owners when they discuss storm-chasing tourism turning severe weather into a tourist attraction, showing how the activity contributes to nature’s commodification process. Seeking to provide an initial anthropological interpretation of the findings, this study suggests that storm-chasing tourism brings together acceptance and exploitation of nature. Indeed, severe weather appears to be sought for its power over humans while also being marketed as an ordinary commodity. Albeit preliminary, this study sheds light on a fundamental feature of storm-chasing tourism that researchers have not yet fully addressed and enhances the comprehension of a piece of humankind’s relationship with nature in current Western societies.

© 2017 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author e-mail: Catherine Morin Boulais, catherine.morin-boulais.1@ulaval.ca
Save