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The Moberly, Missouri, Tornado of 4 July 1995

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  • 1 National Weather Service, Pleasant Hill, Missouri
  • | 2 NOAA/NESDIS/RAMM Branch, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
  • | 3 Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
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Abstract

Tornadic storms that occurred over northeastern Kansas and northern Missouri on 4 July 1995 are examined by combining the latest in National Weather Service technology with more routine datasets. The analysis provides an insightful description of the meteorological setting and evolution that led to the severe weather on this day. Strong thunderstorms first formed where an outflow boundary intersected a cold front, then new activity was triggered along the outflow boundary itself. It was found that small-scale outflow interactions may have played an important role in changing the nature of the convection already under way and were associated with the two most damaging tornadoes of the day. The case is also used to showcase how several new “modernization” datasets can be used together in a quickly accessible manner to provide a valuable and precise overview of a rapidly evolving meteorological event.

Corresponding author address: John F. Weaver, Research Meteorologist, NOAA/NESDIS/RAMM Branch, CIRA, Colorado State University, W. Laporte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Email: weaver@cira.colostate.edu

Abstract

Tornadic storms that occurred over northeastern Kansas and northern Missouri on 4 July 1995 are examined by combining the latest in National Weather Service technology with more routine datasets. The analysis provides an insightful description of the meteorological setting and evolution that led to the severe weather on this day. Strong thunderstorms first formed where an outflow boundary intersected a cold front, then new activity was triggered along the outflow boundary itself. It was found that small-scale outflow interactions may have played an important role in changing the nature of the convection already under way and were associated with the two most damaging tornadoes of the day. The case is also used to showcase how several new “modernization” datasets can be used together in a quickly accessible manner to provide a valuable and precise overview of a rapidly evolving meteorological event.

Corresponding author address: John F. Weaver, Research Meteorologist, NOAA/NESDIS/RAMM Branch, CIRA, Colorado State University, W. Laporte Ave., Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Email: weaver@cira.colostate.edu

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