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A Case Study of the Sensitivity of the Eta Data Assimilation System

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  • * Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies, Madison, Wisconsin
  • | + National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, Madison, Wisconsin
  • | # Environmental Modeling Center, National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Washington, D.C.
  • | @ Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman, Oklahoma
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Abstract

A case study is utilized to determine the sensitivity of the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) to all operational observational data types used within it. The work described in this paper should be of interest to Eta Model users trying to identify the impact of each data type and could benefit other modelers trying to use EDAS analyses and forecasts as initial conditions for other models.

The case study chosen is one characterized by strong Atlantic and Pacific maritime cyclogenesis, and is shortly after the EDAS began using three-dimensional variational analysis. The control run of the EDAS utilizes all 34 of the operational data types. One of these data types is then denied for each of the subsequent experimental runs. Differences between the experimental and control runs are analyzed to demonstrate the sensitivity of the EDAS system to each data type for the analysis and subsequent 48-h forecasts. Results show the necessity of various nonconventional observation types, such as aircraft data, satellite precipitable water, and cloud drift winds. These data types are demonstrated to have a significant impact, especially observations in maritime regions.

Corresponding author address: W. Paul Menzel, UW–CIMSS, 1225 West Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706.

Email: paul.menzel@ssec.wisc.edu

Abstract

A case study is utilized to determine the sensitivity of the Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) to all operational observational data types used within it. The work described in this paper should be of interest to Eta Model users trying to identify the impact of each data type and could benefit other modelers trying to use EDAS analyses and forecasts as initial conditions for other models.

The case study chosen is one characterized by strong Atlantic and Pacific maritime cyclogenesis, and is shortly after the EDAS began using three-dimensional variational analysis. The control run of the EDAS utilizes all 34 of the operational data types. One of these data types is then denied for each of the subsequent experimental runs. Differences between the experimental and control runs are analyzed to demonstrate the sensitivity of the EDAS system to each data type for the analysis and subsequent 48-h forecasts. Results show the necessity of various nonconventional observation types, such as aircraft data, satellite precipitable water, and cloud drift winds. These data types are demonstrated to have a significant impact, especially observations in maritime regions.

Corresponding author address: W. Paul Menzel, UW–CIMSS, 1225 West Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706.

Email: paul.menzel@ssec.wisc.edu

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