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IFPS and the Future of the National Weather Service

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  • 1 Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
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Introduction

The National Weather Service (NWS) is now in the midst of a major paradigm shift regarding the creation and distribution of its forecasts. Instead of writing a wide array of text products, forecasters will make use of an interactive forecast preparation system (IFPS) to construct a 7-day graphical representation of the weather that will be distributed on grids of 5-km grid spacing or better (Ruth 2002). To create these fields, a forecaster starts with model grids at coarser resolution, uses “model interpretation” and “smart” tools to combine and downscale model output to a high-resolution IFPS grid, and then

Introduction

The National Weather Service (NWS) is now in the midst of a major paradigm shift regarding the creation and distribution of its forecasts. Instead of writing a wide array of text products, forecasters will make use of an interactive forecast preparation system (IFPS) to construct a 7-day graphical representation of the weather that will be distributed on grids of 5-km grid spacing or better (Ruth 2002). To create these fields, a forecaster starts with model grids at coarser resolution, uses “model interpretation” and “smart” tools to combine and downscale model output to a high-resolution IFPS grid, and then

Corresponding author address: Clifford F. Mass, Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences, Box 351640, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. Email: cliff@atmos.washington.edu

Introduction

The National Weather Service (NWS) is now in the midst of a major paradigm shift regarding the creation and distribution of its forecasts. Instead of writing a wide array of text products, forecasters will make use of an interactive forecast preparation system (IFPS) to construct a 7-day graphical representation of the weather that will be distributed on grids of 5-km grid spacing or better (Ruth 2002). To create these fields, a forecaster starts with model grids at coarser resolution, uses “model interpretation” and “smart” tools to combine and downscale model output to a high-resolution IFPS grid, and then

Introduction

The National Weather Service (NWS) is now in the midst of a major paradigm shift regarding the creation and distribution of its forecasts. Instead of writing a wide array of text products, forecasters will make use of an interactive forecast preparation system (IFPS) to construct a 7-day graphical representation of the weather that will be distributed on grids of 5-km grid spacing or better (Ruth 2002). To create these fields, a forecaster starts with model grids at coarser resolution, uses “model interpretation” and “smart” tools to combine and downscale model output to a high-resolution IFPS grid, and then

Corresponding author address: Clifford F. Mass, Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences, Box 351640, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. Email: cliff@atmos.washington.edu

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