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  • 1 Mauritius Meteorological Services, Vacoas, Mauritius
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Abstract

In their study on the wind–pressure relationship (WPR) that exists in tropical cyclones, Knaff and Zehr presented results of the use of the Dvorak Atlantic WPR for estimating central pressure and maximum wind speed of tropical cyclones. These show some fairly large departures of estimated central pressure and maximum surface winds from observed values. Based on a study carried out in the southwest Indian Ocean (SWIO), it is believed that improvements in the use of the Dvorak WPR can be achieved by using the size of a closed isobar (it is the 1004-hPa closed isobar in the SWIO) to determine whether to use the North Atlantic (NA), the western North Pacific (WNP), or a mean of the NA and WNP Dvorak WPR for estimating central pressure and maximum wind speed in tropical cyclones.

Corresponding author address: Mr. Shyamnath Veerasamy, Mauritius Meteorological Services, St. Paul Road, Vacoas, Mauritius. Email: shyamnath.veera@yahoo.com

Abstract

In their study on the wind–pressure relationship (WPR) that exists in tropical cyclones, Knaff and Zehr presented results of the use of the Dvorak Atlantic WPR for estimating central pressure and maximum wind speed of tropical cyclones. These show some fairly large departures of estimated central pressure and maximum surface winds from observed values. Based on a study carried out in the southwest Indian Ocean (SWIO), it is believed that improvements in the use of the Dvorak WPR can be achieved by using the size of a closed isobar (it is the 1004-hPa closed isobar in the SWIO) to determine whether to use the North Atlantic (NA), the western North Pacific (WNP), or a mean of the NA and WNP Dvorak WPR for estimating central pressure and maximum wind speed in tropical cyclones.

Corresponding author address: Mr. Shyamnath Veerasamy, Mauritius Meteorological Services, St. Paul Road, Vacoas, Mauritius. Email: shyamnath.veera@yahoo.com

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