Forecast Advisory for a Cold-Season Heavy Rainfall/Flood Event That Developed from Multiple Interactions of the Cold-Surge Vortex with Cold-Surge Flows in the South China Sea

Tsing-Chang Chen Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

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Jenq-Dar Tsay Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

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Jun Matsumoto Department of Geography, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, and Department of Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere–Land Processes Research, JAMSTEC, Yokosuka, Japan

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Jordan Alpert National Centers for Environmental Predication/Environmental Modeling Center, College Park, Maryland

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Abstract

The peak intensity occurrence frequency over the life cycles of parent cold-surge vortices (CSVs) for heavy rainfall/flood (HRF) events is classified into two types depending on their life cycles having two or three peak intensities, denoted as HRF2 or HRF3, respectively. The formation of an HRF2 event from its parent CSV(HRF2) formation is ≤5 days, while the formation of an HRF3 event is ≥6 days. The latter group contributes ~57% of the total number of HRF events. As a result of some model constraints, the formation and development of HRF3 events are not well forecasted by the Global Forecast System (GFS) and regional forecast models. The life cycle and second peak intensity for CSV(HRF3) allow for the introduction of a forecast advisory for HRF3 events. Identification of CSVs and two sufficient requirements for the formation and occurrence of HRF events were developed by previous studies. Nevertheless, two new necessary steps are now included in the proposed forecast advisory. The population ratio for CSV(HRF3) and the regular CSV is only about 15%. The occurrence optimum time to for the CSV(HRF3) second peak intensity from this vortex formation is about 3 days 6 h. The GFS forecast over to is utilized to identify CSV(HRF3). Then, the relay of the GFS forecast from the occurrence time of the CSV(HRF3) second peak is used to predict the formation/occurrence of HRF3 events. Six HRF3 events during cold seasons for 2013–16 are used to test the feasibility of this forecast advisory. Results clearly demonstrate this advisory is a success for the forecast of HRF3 events over the entire life cycles of their parent CSV(HRF3)s.

Supplemental information related to this paper is available at the Journals Online website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/WAF-D-16-0148.s1.

© 2017 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author e-mail: Tsing-Chang (Mike) Chen, tmchen@iastate.edu

Abstract

The peak intensity occurrence frequency over the life cycles of parent cold-surge vortices (CSVs) for heavy rainfall/flood (HRF) events is classified into two types depending on their life cycles having two or three peak intensities, denoted as HRF2 or HRF3, respectively. The formation of an HRF2 event from its parent CSV(HRF2) formation is ≤5 days, while the formation of an HRF3 event is ≥6 days. The latter group contributes ~57% of the total number of HRF events. As a result of some model constraints, the formation and development of HRF3 events are not well forecasted by the Global Forecast System (GFS) and regional forecast models. The life cycle and second peak intensity for CSV(HRF3) allow for the introduction of a forecast advisory for HRF3 events. Identification of CSVs and two sufficient requirements for the formation and occurrence of HRF events were developed by previous studies. Nevertheless, two new necessary steps are now included in the proposed forecast advisory. The population ratio for CSV(HRF3) and the regular CSV is only about 15%. The occurrence optimum time to for the CSV(HRF3) second peak intensity from this vortex formation is about 3 days 6 h. The GFS forecast over to is utilized to identify CSV(HRF3). Then, the relay of the GFS forecast from the occurrence time of the CSV(HRF3) second peak is used to predict the formation/occurrence of HRF3 events. Six HRF3 events during cold seasons for 2013–16 are used to test the feasibility of this forecast advisory. Results clearly demonstrate this advisory is a success for the forecast of HRF3 events over the entire life cycles of their parent CSV(HRF3)s.

Supplemental information related to this paper is available at the Journals Online website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/WAF-D-16-0148.s1.

© 2017 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author e-mail: Tsing-Chang (Mike) Chen, tmchen@iastate.edu

Supplementary Materials

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