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The Influence of Weather Watch Type on the Quality of Tornado Warnings and Its Implications for Future Forecasting Systems

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  • 1 a Center for Risk and Crisis Management, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 2 b National Institute for Risk and Resilience, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 3 c Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 4 d NOAA/Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 5 e NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma
  • | 6 f School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma
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Abstract

While many studies have looked at the quality of forecast products, few have attempted to understand the relationship between them. We begin to consider whether or not such an influence exists by analyzing storm-based tornado warning product metrics with respect to whether they occurred within a severe weather watch and, if so, what type of watch they occurred within. The probability of detection, false alarm ratio, and lead time all show a general improvement with increasing watch severity. In fact, the probability of detection increased more as a function of watch-type severity than the change in probability of detection during the time period of analysis. False alarm ratio decreased as watch type increased in severity, but with a much smaller magnitude than the difference in probability of detection. Lead time also improved with an increase in watch-type severity. Warnings outside of any watch had a mean lead time of 5.5 min, while those inside of a particularly dangerous situation tornado watch had a mean lead time of 15.1 min. These results indicate that the existence and type of severe weather watch may have an influence on the quality of tornado warnings. However, it is impossible to separate the influence of weather watches from possible differences in warning strategy or differences in environmental characteristics that make it more or less challenging to warn for tornadoes. Future studies should attempt to disentangle these numerous influences to assess how much influence intermediate products have on downstream products.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Makenzie J. Krocak, makenzie.krocak@noaa.gov

Abstract

While many studies have looked at the quality of forecast products, few have attempted to understand the relationship between them. We begin to consider whether or not such an influence exists by analyzing storm-based tornado warning product metrics with respect to whether they occurred within a severe weather watch and, if so, what type of watch they occurred within. The probability of detection, false alarm ratio, and lead time all show a general improvement with increasing watch severity. In fact, the probability of detection increased more as a function of watch-type severity than the change in probability of detection during the time period of analysis. False alarm ratio decreased as watch type increased in severity, but with a much smaller magnitude than the difference in probability of detection. Lead time also improved with an increase in watch-type severity. Warnings outside of any watch had a mean lead time of 5.5 min, while those inside of a particularly dangerous situation tornado watch had a mean lead time of 15.1 min. These results indicate that the existence and type of severe weather watch may have an influence on the quality of tornado warnings. However, it is impossible to separate the influence of weather watches from possible differences in warning strategy or differences in environmental characteristics that make it more or less challenging to warn for tornadoes. Future studies should attempt to disentangle these numerous influences to assess how much influence intermediate products have on downstream products.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Makenzie J. Krocak, makenzie.krocak@noaa.gov
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