Differences Between Severe and Nonsevere Warm-Season, Nocturnal Bow Echo Environments

View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

Nocturnal bow echoes can produce wind damage, even in situations where elevated convection occurs. Accurate forecasts of wind potential tend to be more challenging for operational forecasters than for daytime bows because of incomplete understanding of how elevated convection interacts with the stable boundary layer. The present study compares the differences in warm-season, nocturnal bow echo environments in which high intensity (>70 knots) severe winds (HS), low intensity (50-55 knots) severe winds (LS), and nonsevere winds (NS) occurred. Using a sample of 132 events from 2010 to 2018, 43 forecast parameters from the SPC mesoanalysis system were examined over a 120 x 120 km region centered on the strongest storm report or most pronounced bowing convective segment. Severe composite parameters are found to be among the best discriminators between all severity types, especially Derecho Composite Parameter (DCP) and Significant Tornado Parameter (STP). Shear parameters are significant discriminators only between severe and nonsevere cases, while Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) parameters are significant discriminators only between HS and LS/NS bow echoes. Convective Inhibition (CIN) is among the worst discriminators for all severity types. The parameters providing the most predictive skill for HS bow echoes are STP and most unstable CAPE, and for LS bow echoes are V wind component at best CAPE (VMXP) level, STP, and Supercell Composite Parameter. Combinations of two parameters are shown to improve forecasting skill further, with the combination of surface-based CAPE and 0 – 6 km U shear component, and DCP and VMXP, providing the most skillful HS and LS forecasts, respectively.

Corresponding author address: Ezio Luca Mauri, Iowa State University, 3018, Agronomy Hall, Ames, IA 50011. E-mail: emauri@iastate.edu

Abstract

Nocturnal bow echoes can produce wind damage, even in situations where elevated convection occurs. Accurate forecasts of wind potential tend to be more challenging for operational forecasters than for daytime bows because of incomplete understanding of how elevated convection interacts with the stable boundary layer. The present study compares the differences in warm-season, nocturnal bow echo environments in which high intensity (>70 knots) severe winds (HS), low intensity (50-55 knots) severe winds (LS), and nonsevere winds (NS) occurred. Using a sample of 132 events from 2010 to 2018, 43 forecast parameters from the SPC mesoanalysis system were examined over a 120 x 120 km region centered on the strongest storm report or most pronounced bowing convective segment. Severe composite parameters are found to be among the best discriminators between all severity types, especially Derecho Composite Parameter (DCP) and Significant Tornado Parameter (STP). Shear parameters are significant discriminators only between severe and nonsevere cases, while Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) parameters are significant discriminators only between HS and LS/NS bow echoes. Convective Inhibition (CIN) is among the worst discriminators for all severity types. The parameters providing the most predictive skill for HS bow echoes are STP and most unstable CAPE, and for LS bow echoes are V wind component at best CAPE (VMXP) level, STP, and Supercell Composite Parameter. Combinations of two parameters are shown to improve forecasting skill further, with the combination of surface-based CAPE and 0 – 6 km U shear component, and DCP and VMXP, providing the most skillful HS and LS forecasts, respectively.

Corresponding author address: Ezio Luca Mauri, Iowa State University, 3018, Agronomy Hall, Ames, IA 50011. E-mail: emauri@iastate.edu
Save