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The Influence of Wildfire Smoke on Cloud Microphysics during the September 2020 Pacific Northwest Wildfires

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  • 1 a Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • | 2 b Washington State University, Pullman, Washington
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Abstract

During late summer 2020, large wildfires over the Pacific Northwest produced dense smoke that impacted the region for an extended period. During this period of poor air quality, persistent low-level cloud coverage was poorly forecast by operational numerical weather prediction models, which dissipated clouds too quickly or produced insufficient cloud coverage extent. This deficiency raises questions about the influence of wildfire smoke on low-level clouds in the marine environment of the Pacific Northwest. This paper investigates the effects of wildfire smoke on the properties of low-level clouds, including their formation, microphysical properties, and dissipation. A case study from 12 to 14 September 2020 is used as a testbed to evaluate the impact of wildfire smoke on such clouds. Observations from satellites and surface observing sites, coupled with mesoscale model simulations, are applied to understand the influence of wildfire smoke during this event. Results indicate that the presence of thick smoke over Washington led to decreased temperatures in the lower troposphere, which enhanced low-level cloud coverage, with smoke particles altering the microphysical structure of clouds to favor high concentrations of small droplets. Thermodynamic changes due to smoke are found to be the primary driver of enhanced cloud lifetime during these events, with microphysical changes to clouds as a secondary contributing factor. However, both the thermodynamic and microphysical effects are necessary to produce a realistic simulation.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Robert Conrick, rconrick@uw.edu

Abstract

During late summer 2020, large wildfires over the Pacific Northwest produced dense smoke that impacted the region for an extended period. During this period of poor air quality, persistent low-level cloud coverage was poorly forecast by operational numerical weather prediction models, which dissipated clouds too quickly or produced insufficient cloud coverage extent. This deficiency raises questions about the influence of wildfire smoke on low-level clouds in the marine environment of the Pacific Northwest. This paper investigates the effects of wildfire smoke on the properties of low-level clouds, including their formation, microphysical properties, and dissipation. A case study from 12 to 14 September 2020 is used as a testbed to evaluate the impact of wildfire smoke on such clouds. Observations from satellites and surface observing sites, coupled with mesoscale model simulations, are applied to understand the influence of wildfire smoke during this event. Results indicate that the presence of thick smoke over Washington led to decreased temperatures in the lower troposphere, which enhanced low-level cloud coverage, with smoke particles altering the microphysical structure of clouds to favor high concentrations of small droplets. Thermodynamic changes due to smoke are found to be the primary driver of enhanced cloud lifetime during these events, with microphysical changes to clouds as a secondary contributing factor. However, both the thermodynamic and microphysical effects are necessary to produce a realistic simulation.

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Corresponding author: Robert Conrick, rconrick@uw.edu
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