The reflectivity pattern from a 5 cm Doppler radar is compared to that from a colocated 10 cm Doppler radar to determine the relative attenuation of the 5 cm signal. Maximum attenuation occurred on 10 April 1979 during the alignment of two severe thunderstorms on the same radar azimuth. During alignment, the near-range storm caused total attenuation of the 5 cm signal from the far-range storm. Maximum attenuation in the far-range storm was much in excess of 23 dB. was on the order of 30dB. Characteristics of the two storms are presented, along with the rainfall rate (maximum of 6.4 in h−1, of the Maximum attenuation in the back side of the near-range storm was on the order of 30 dB. Characteristics of the two storms are presented, along with the rainfall rate (maximum of 6.4 in h−1) of the near-range storm, a reflectivity contour analysis for each radar, and difference fields showing the attenuation of the 5 cm signal in both storms. Some operational problems associated with a 5 cm radar in an attenuating environment include degradation of peak values and distortion of severe weather indicators, as well as the possibility of the loss of the capability to detect severe storms.

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Footnotes

1Air Weather Service, Scott AFB, Ill. 62225.

2National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Okla. 73069.

3 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, Mass. 01731.