Collaborative activities between operational forecasters and meteorological research scientists have the potential to provide significant benefits to both groups and to society as a whole, yet such collaboration is rare. An exception to this state of affairs is occurring at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and Storm Prediction Center (SPC). Since the SPC moved from Kansas City to the NSSL facility in Norman, Oklahoma in 1997, collaborative efforts between researchers and forecasters at this facility have begun to flourish. This article presents a historical background for this interaction and discusses some of the factors that have helped this collaboration gain momentum. It focuses on the 2001 Spring Program, a collaborative effort focusing on experimental forecasting techniques and numerical model evaluation, as a prototype for organized interactions between researchers and forecasters. In addition, the many tangible and intangible benefits of this unusual working relationship are discussed.

This content is only available as a PDF.

Footnotes

Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, and NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma

NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma

Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, and NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, and NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma

NOAA/OAR/National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma