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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

The 1971 hurricane season featured 103 seedlings, 23 depressions, and 12 named storms. An anomalous circulation pattern developed over the Gulf of Mexico and the southwestern Atlantic Ocean in September and spawned a large number of depressions and storms within the subtropical belt near or north of latitude 25°N.

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WILLIAM J. DENNEY

Abstract

The 1971 season was characterized by recurrent and persistent patterns of activity. A record 12 hurricanes and six tropical storms were counted. Satellite pictures and ship reports provided most of the clues to developing storms. U.S. Air Force Weather Reconnaissance provided most of the location, intensity, and structure information after development was underway.

Several of the hurricanes and storms rate special attention: Agatha, a small violent May hurricane, hit the village of Playa Azul, Mexico; Bridget did $40 million damage at Acapulco, Mexico; Denise, Francene, Olivia, and Priscilla had reported surface winds of 100 kt or more; Monica was described by reconnaissance (which could not penetrate) as the strongest ever seen in the area; Katrina was an elusive ministorm that caused floods at Los Mochis, Mexico; Lily, a violent, recurving hurricane, took 12 lives in Mexico and caught several ships in her hurricane-force winds; and Olivia had an earlier existence as Caribbean hurricane Irene.

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R. H. SIMPSON and JOSEPH M. PELISSIER

Abstract

A general overview of the 1970 hurricane season in the North Atlantic is presented together with detailed accounts of all named tropical cyclones and certain subtropical or hybrid storms.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

The history of all tropical systems that formed over the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mexico during the 1970 hurricane season has been documented. There were a total of 87 systems from which 26 depressions and seven named storms evolved.

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WILLIAM J. DENNEY

Abstract

A statistical résumé of the season is presented, and a tentative climatology is proposed, based on 5 yr of operational satellite coverage. Basic data were increased through more reconnaissance flights and satellite pictures. No direct storm casualties or damage from storm winds or seas were reported. Casualties and damage resulting from the Arizona flood diaster were indirectly related to tropical storm Norma. The chronicle of hurricanes and tropical storms deals mainly with the relationship of the data to hurricane intensity and to physical processes within the various tropical cyclones.

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R. H. SIMPSON, ARNOLD L. SUGG, and STAFF

Abstract

The 1969 hurricane season in the North Atlantic area, considered in its entirety, and synoptic and statistical aspects of individual storms are discussed.

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NEIL L. FRANK

Abstract

A census of Atlantic tropical systems of 1969 presents information on the history of each tropical wave or disturbance, including the dates these systems passed three key stations: Dakar, Barbados, and San Andrés Island.

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ROBERT A. BAUM

Abstract

A résumé of the 1969 tropical cyclone season of the eastern North Pacific Ocean is presented. A comparison between aircraft reconnaissance and satellite wind-speed estimates is made with limited data. The presentation is a chronicle of individual tropical storms and hurricanes during 1969, including satellite pictures and near-synoptic post-reconnaissance debriefings.

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L. F. HUBERT

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

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ARNOLD L. SUGG and PAUL J. HEBERT

Abstract

The 1968 hurricane season in the North Atlantic area, considered in its entirety, and synoptic and statistical aspects of individual storms are discussed.

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