Browse

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 2,838 items for :

  • Weather and Forecasting x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Sean Ernst, Joe Ripberger, Makenzie J. Krocak, Hank Jenkins-Smith, and Carol Silva

Abstract

Although severe weather forecast products, such as the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) convective outlook, are much more accurate than climatology at day-to-week time scales, tornadoes and severe thunderstorms claim dozens of lives and cause billions of dollars in damage every year. While the accuracy of this outlook has been well documented, less work has been done to explore the comprehension of the product by nonexpert users like the general public. This study seeks to fill this key knowledge gap by collecting data from a representative survey of U.S. adults in the lower 48 states about their use and interpretation of the SPC convective outlook. Participants in this study were asked to rank the words and colors used in the outlook from least to greatest risk, and their answers were compared through visualizations and statistical tests across multiple demographics. Results show that the U.S. public ranks the outlook colors similarly to their ordering in the outlook but switches the positions of several of the outlook words as compared to the operational product. Logistic regression models also reveal that more numerate individuals more correctly rank the SPC outlook words and colors. These findings suggest that the words used in the convective outlook may confuse nonexpert users, and that future work should continue to use input from public surveys to test potential improvements in the choice of outlook words. Using more easily understood words may help to increase the outlook’s decision support value and potentially reduce the harm caused by severe weather events.

Restricted access
Jinxiao Li, Qing Bao, Yimin Liu, Guoxiong Wu, Lei Wang, Bian He, Xiaocong Wang, Jing Yang, Xiaofei Wu, and Zili Shen

Abstract

There is a distinct gap between tropical cyclone (TC) prediction skill and the societal demand for accurate predictions, especially in the western Pacific (WP) and North Atlantic (NA) basins, where densely populated areas are frequently affected by intense TC events. In this study, seasonal prediction skill for TC activity in the WP and NA of the fully coupled FGOALS-f2 V1.0 dynamical prediction system is evaluated. In total, 36 years of monthly hindcasts from 1981 to 2016 were completed with 24 ensemble members. The FGOALS-f2 V1.0 system has been used for real-time predictions since June 2017 with 35 ensemble members, and has been operationally used in the two operational prediction centers of China. Our evaluation indicates that FGOALS-f2 V1.0 can reasonably reproduce the density of TC genesis locations and tracks in the WP and NA. The model shows significant skill in terms of the TC number correlation in the WP (0.60) and the NA (0.61) from 1981 to 2015; however, the model underestimates accumulated cyclone energy. When the number of ensemble members was increased from 2 to 24, the correlation coefficients clearly increased (from 0.21 to 0.60 in the WP, and from 0.18 to 0.61 in the NA). FGOALS-f2 V1.0 also successfully reproduces the genesis potential index pattern and the relationship between El Niño–Southern Oscillation and TC activity, which is one of the dominant contributors to TC seasonal prediction skill. However, the biases in large-scale factors are barriers to the improvement of the seasonal prediction skill, e.g., larger wind shear, higher relative humidity, and weaker potential intensity of TCs. For real-time predictions in the WP, FGOALS-f2 V1.0 demonstrates a skillful prediction for track density in terms of landfalling TCs, and the model successfully forecasts the correct sign of seasonal anomalies of landfalling TCs for various regions in China.

Open access
Charles R. Sampson, Efren A. Serra, John A. Knaff, and Joshua H. Cossuth

Abstract

The U.S. Navy is keenly interested in analyses and predictions of waves at sea due to their effects on important tasks such as shipping, base preparedness, and disaster relief. U.S. Tropical Cyclone (TC) Forecast Centers routinely disseminate wind probabilities consistent with official TC forecasts worldwide, but do not do the same for wave forecasts. These probabilities are especially important at longer leads where TC forecast accuracy diminishes. This work describes global wave probabilities consistent with both the official TC forecasts and their wind probabilities. Real-time runs for 84 TCs between May 2018 and March 2019, with probabilities generated for 12- and 18-ft significant wave heights are used to calculate verification statistics. This results in 347, 319, 261, 214, 155, and 112 verification cases at lead times of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days where each verification case consists of a 20° × 20° latitude–longitude grid around the verifying TC position. When compared with wave probabilities generated solely by a global numerical weather prediction model, the wind probability–based algorithm demonstrates improved consistency with official forecasts and provides additional benefits. Those benefits include an improved capability to discriminate between 12- and 18-ft significant wave events and nonevents. The verification statistics also shows that the wind probability–based algorithm has a consistent high bias. How these biases can be reduced in future efforts is also discussed.

Open access
Makenzie J. Krocak, Matthew D. Flournoy, and Harold E. Brooks

Abstract

Increasing tornado warning skill in terms of the probability of detection and false-alarm ratio remains an important operational goal. Although many studies have examined tornado warning performance in a broad sense, less focus has been placed on warning performance within subdaily convective events. In this study, we use the NWS tornado verification database to examine tornado warning performance by order-of-tornado within each convective day. We combine this database with tornado reports to relate warning performance to environmental characteristics. On convective days with multiple tornadoes, the first tornado is warned significantly less often than the middle and last tornadoes. More favorable kinematic environmental characteristics, like increasing 0–1-km shear and storm-relative helicity, are associated with better warning performance related to the first tornado of the convective day. Thermodynamic and composite parameters are less correlated with warning performance. During tornadic events, over one-half of false alarms occur after the last tornado of the day decays, and false alarms are 2 times as likely to be issued during this time as before the first tornado forms. These results indicate that forecasters may be better “primed” (or more prepared) to issue warnings on middle and last tornadoes of the day and must overcome a higher threshold to warn on the first tornado of the day. To overcome this challenge, using kinematic environmental characteristics and intermediate products on the watch-to-warning scale may help.

Restricted access
Matthew T. Bray, Steven M. Cavallo, and Howard B. Bluestein

Abstract

Midlatitude jet streaks are known to produce conditions broadly supportive of tornado outbreaks, including forcing for large-scale ascent, increased wind shear, and decreased static stability. Although many processes may initiate a jet streak, we focus here on the development of jet maxima by interactions between the polar jet and tropopause polar vortices (TPVs). Originating from the Arctic, TPVs are long-lived circulations on the tropopause, which can be advected into the midlatitudes. We hypothesize that when these vortices interact with the jet, they may contribute supplemental forcing for ascent and shear to tornado outbreaks, assuming other environmental conditions supportive of tornado development exist. Using a case set of significant tornado outbreak days from three states—Oklahoma, Illinois, and Alabama—we show that a vortex–jet streak structure is present (within 1250 km) in around two-thirds of tornado outbreaks. These vortices are commonly Arctic in origin (i.e., are TPVs) and are advected through a consistent path of entry into the midlatitudes in the week before the outbreak, moving across the northern Pacific and into the Gulf of Alaska before turning equatorward along the North American coast. These vortices are shown to be more intense and longer-lived than average. We further demonstrate that statistically significant patterns of wind shear, quasigeostrophic forcing for ascent, and low static stability are present over the outbreak regions on the synoptic scale. In addition, we find that TPVs associated with tornadic events occur most often in the spring and are associated with greater low-level moisture when compared to non-tornadic TPV cases.

Restricted access
Yanshuang Xie, Shaoping Shang, Jinquan Chen, Feng Zhang, Zhigan He, Guomei Wei, Jingyu Wu, Benlu Zhu, and Yindong Zeng

Abstract

Accurate storm surge forecasts provided rapidly could support timely decision-making with consideration of tropical cyclone (TC) forecasting error. This study developed a fast storm surge ensemble prediction method based on TC track probability forecasting and searching optimization of a numerical scenario database (SONSD). In a case study of the Fujian Province coast (China), a storm surge scenario database was established using numerical simulations generated by 93 150 hypothetical TCs. In a GIS-based visualization system, a single surge forecast representing 2562 distinct typhoon tracks and the occurrence probability of overflow of seawalls along the coast could be achieved in 1–2 min. Application to the cases of Typhoon Soudelor (2015) and Typhoon Maria (2018) demonstrated that the proposed method is feasible and effective. Storm surge calculated by SONSD had excellent agreement with numerical model results (i.e., mean MAE and RMSE: 7.1 and 10.7 cm, respectively, correlation coefficient: >0.9). Tide prediction also performed well with MAE/RMSE of 9.7/11.6 cm versus the harmonic tide, and MAE/RMSE of phase prediction for all high waters of 0.25/0.31 h versus observations. The predicted high-water level was satisfactory (MAE of 10.8 cm versus observations) when the forecasted and actual positions of the typhoon were close. When the forecasted typhoon position error was large, the ensemble surge prediction effectively reduced prediction error (i.e., the negative bias of −58.5 cm reduced to −5.2 cm versus observations), which helped avoid missed alert warnings. The proposed method could be applied in other regions to provide rapid and accurate decision-making support for government departments.

Open access
Aaron J. Hill and Russ S. Schumacher

Abstract

Approximately seven years of daily initializations from the convection-allowing National Severe Storms Laboratory Weather Research and Forecasting Model are used as inputs to train random forest (RF) machine learning models to probabilistically predict instances of excessive rainfall. Unlike other hazards, excessive rainfall does not have an accepted definition, so multiple definitions of excessive rainfall and flash flooding—including flash flood reports and 24-h average recurrence intervals (ARIs)—are used to explore RF configuration forecast sensitivities. RF forecasts are analogous to operational Weather Prediction Center (WPC) day-1 Excessive Rainfall Outlooks (EROs) and their resolution, reliability, and skill are strongly influenced by rainfall definitions and how inputs are assembled for training. Models trained with 1-yr ARI exceedances defined by the Stage-IV (ST4) precipitation analysis perform poorly in the northern Great Plains and Southwest United States, in part due to a high bias in the number of training events in these regions. Increasing the ARI threshold to 2 years or removing ST4 data from training, optimizing forecast skill geographically, and spatially averaging meteorological inputs for training generally results in improved CONUS-wide RF forecast skill. Both EROs and RF forecasts have seasonal skill—–poor forecasts in the late fall and winter and skillful forecasts in the summer and early fall. However, the EROs are consistently and significantly better than their RF counterparts, regardless of RF configuration, particularly in the summer months. The results suggest careful consideration should be made when developing ML-based probabilistic precipitation forecasts with convection-allowing model inputs, and further development is necessary to consider these forecast products for operational implementation.

Restricted access
Jörg Steinert, Patrick Tracksdorf, and Dirk Heizenreder

Abstract

The analysis and forecast of precipitation characteristics is a key task for national meteorological services for providing high-quality weather forecasts and warnings. Beside the precipitation amount, the precipitation type is essential to describe and evaluate the recent, ongoing, and future weather situations. This paper introduces a new surface-based hybrid hydrometeor classification algorithm. The presented method combines polarimetric radar observations at radar beam height from the C-band dual-polarization weather radar network of the German Weather Service [Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD)] with corrected thermodynamical profiles of numerical weather prediction (NWP) model output and extrapolates the hydrometeor classes at radar beam height to a height of 2 m above ground level (AGL). The implemented technique parameterizes the microphysical processes in the lower troposphere based on the appropriate thermodynamical profile that the hydrometeors have to pass along their way from the radar beam height to the surface. Due to errors in NWP output, the NWP vertical profiles of temperature and humidity are adjusted by using several types of surface stations with high spatial and temporal resolution. Verification results show considerable improvements in the hydrometeor classification near the ground compared to the radar sweep height. After an additional positive in-house evaluation, the presented method is integrated into DWD’s operational environment. The topic of this paper is to describe the processing steps for the computation of the near-surface precipitation type. In addition, example cases and a verification study complement the explanations.

Open access
Joseph B. Zambon, Ruoying He, John C. Warner, and Christie A. Hegermiller

Abstract

Hurricane Florence (2018) devastated the coastal communities of the Carolinas through heavy rainfall that resulted in massive flooding. Florence was characterized by an abrupt reduction in intensity (Saffir–Simpson category 4 to category 1) just prior to landfall and synoptic-scale interactions that stalled the storm over the Carolinas for several days. We conducted a series of numerical modeling experiments in coupled and uncoupled configurations to examine the impact of sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean waves on storm characteristics. In addition to experiments using a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean–wave model, we introduced the capability of the atmospheric model to modulate wind stress and surface fluxes by ocean waves through data from an uncoupled wave model. We examined these experiments by comparing track, intensity, strength, SST, storm structure, wave height, surface roughness, heat fluxes, and precipitation in order to determine the impacts of resolving ocean conditions with varying degrees of coupling. We found differences in the storm’s intensity and strength, with the best correlation coefficient of intensity (r = 0.89) and strength (r = 0.95) coming from the fully coupled simulations. Further analysis into surface roughness parameterizations added to the atmospheric model revealed differences in the spatial distribution and magnitude of the largest roughness lengths. Adding ocean and wave features to the model further modified the fluxes due to more realistic cooling beneath the storm, which in turn modified the precipitation field. Our experiments highlight significant differences in how air–sea processes impact hurricane modeling. The storm characteristics of track, intensity, strength, and precipitation at landfall are crucial to predictability and forecasting of future landfalling hurricanes.

Open access
Soo-Hyun Kim, Hye-Yeong Chun, Dan-Bi Lee, Jung-Hoon Kim, and Robert D. Sharman

Abstract

Based on a convective gravity wave drag parameterization scheme in a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, previously proposed near-cloud turbulence (NCT) diagnostics for better detecting turbulence near convection are tested and evaluated by using global in situ flight data and outputs from the operational global NWP model of the Korea Meteorological Administration for one year (from December 2016 to November 2017). For comparison, 11 widely used clear air turbulence (CAT) diagnostics currently used in operational NWP-based aviation turbulence forecasting systems are separately computed. For selected cases, NCT diagnostics predict more accurately localized turbulence events over convective regions with better intensity, which is clearly distinguished from the turbulence areas diagnosed by conventional CAT diagnostics that they mostly failed to forecast with broad areas and low magnitudes. Although overall performance of NCT diagnostics for one whole year is lower than conventional CAT diagnostics due to the fact that NCT diagnostics exclusively focus on the isolated NCT events, adding the NCT diagnostics to CAT diagnostics improves the performance of aviation turbulence forecasting. Especially in the summertime, performance in terms of an area under the curve (AUC) based on probability of detection statistics is the best (AUC = 0.837 with a 4% increase, compared to conventional CAT forecasts) when the mean of all CAT and NCT diagnostics is used, while performance in terms of root-mean-square error is the best when the maximum among combined CAT and single NCT diagnostic is used. This implies that including NCT diagnostics to currently used NWP-based aviation turbulence forecasting systems should be beneficial for safety of air travel.

Restricted access