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Mark A. Lander and Michael D. Angove

Abstract

This paper is designed to be an annual summary of the Eastern Hemisphere tropical cyclones of 1995. The tropical cyclone statistics presented are those of the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Guam. The text focuses primarily upon the tropical cyclones that occurred in the western North Pacific during 1995; however, since the area of responsibility of the Joint Typhoon Warning Center covers the entire Eastern Hemisphere, brief summaries of the tropical cyclone activity within the north Indian Ocean, south Indian Ocean, and the southwest Pacific are also presented. Overall, 1995 was a relatively quiet year in the Eastern Hemisphere: the 22 tropical cyclones of the Southern Hemisphere were only one shy of the record low of 21, and for the first time since 1988 the number of tropical storms and typhoons in the western North Pacific was below normal. In the western North Pacific, there was a marked shift to the west of the preferred region for the genesis and development of tropical cyclones. This is consistent with the end of persistent large-scale circulation anomalies characteristic of the warm phase of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the onset (during 1995) of weak ENSO cold-phase anomalies (i.e., La Niña conditions).

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Lixion A. Avila and Edward N. Rappaport

Abstract

The 1994 Atlantic hurricane season had only three hurricanes forming from just seven tropical storms. Several of these tropical cyclones, however, caused loss of life and great damage. Gordon, as a tropical storm, produced floods that killed more than 1100 people in Haiti. Alberto, Beryl, and Gordon hit the United States, causing 38 deaths and nearly $1 billion in damage over the southeastern states.

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Richard J. Pasch and Max Mayfield

Abstract

An account of the 1994 hurricane season in the eastern North Pacific Ocean is given. The numbers of hurricanes and tropical storms were near normal, but the activity tended to occur farther to the west in the basin than usual. Hurricane Rosa was the only system of the season to make landfall.

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Richard J. Pasch and Edward N. Rappaport

Abstract

The 1993 hurricane season is summarized. and individual tropical storms and hurricanes are described. Overall, the season was relatively inactive, but tropical storms and hurricanes were responsible for a large number of deaths in South America, Central America, and Mexico. Only one hurricane, Emily, made landfall in the United States.

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Lixion A. Avila and Richard J. Pasch

Abstract

A total of 70 tropical waves (also known as African or easterly waves) were counted in the Atlantic basin during the 1993 hurricane season. These waves led to the formation of 9 of the 10 total number of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic hurricane basin. It appears that tropical waves led to the formation of practically all of the eastern Pacific tropical cyclones in 1993.

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Lixion A. Avila and Max Mayfield

Abstract

The National Hurricane Center tracked 14 tropical storms, 10 of which became hurricanes, during the 1993 eastern North Pacific hurricane season. Four named tropical cyclones and one tropical depression made landfall in Mexico. A general overview of the 1993 hurricane season is presented.

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Max Mayfield, Lixion Avila, and Edward N. Rappaport

Abstract

The 1992 hurricane season is summarized, including accounts of individual storms. Six tropical storms were tracked, of which four became hurricanes. In addition, one subtropical storm formed during the year. The season will be remembered most, however, for Hurricane Andrew. Although Andrew was the only hurricane to make landfall in the contiguous United States during 1992, it earned the distinction of becoming the most expensive natural disaster in United States history.

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Richard J. Pasch and Lixion A. Avila

Abstract

A total of 69 tropical waves (also known as African and easterly waves) were counted in the Atlantic basin during the 1992 hurricane season. As was the case in 1991, the waves were, in general, relatively weak. These waves led to the formation of only four tropical depressions in the Atlantic hurricane basin, of which one intensified into a tropical storm and another intensified into Hurricane Andrew. Andrew was the only 1992 Atlantic hurricane to originate from a tropical wave. There were five additional tropical depressions that were primarily initiated by systems of nontropical origin. These produced three hurricanes and one tropical storm. It appears that tropical waves led to the formation of practically all of the eastern Pacific tropical cyclones in 1992.

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Miles B. Lawrence and Edward N. Rappaport

Abstract

The National Hurricane Center tracked a record-breaking 27 tropical cyclones in the eastern North Pacific Ocean during 1992. Of the 27, 24 became tropical storms (also a record) and 14 became hurricanes. These records are based on data starting in 1966, which is when routine satellite surveillance began. Four hurricanes affected mainland Mexico.

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Richard J. Pasch and Lixion A. Avila

Abstract

The 1991 hurricane season is summarized, including accounts of individual storms. Eight tropical storms were tracked, of which four became hurricanes. Only one tropical cyclone, Hurricane Bob, hit the United States.

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